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Tag Archives: Fall Gardening in Dallas

Sweet Potatoes…Cornerstones of Southern Tradition

Beauregard Sweet Potatoes in Sheila’s Garden

Sheila Kostelny led the sweet potato segment of the panel discussion, sharing some insightful information about what many consider to be one of the world’s most nutritious vegetables.

*We have Christopher Columbus to thank for discovering the sweet potato on one of his voyages to the West Indies. He was so impressed that upon his return to Spain, he brought some back to Queen Isabella. Later explorers found sweet potatoes growing in much of Central and South America. Most historians think the sweet potato arrived in the U.S. after Columbus, as a result of trading between the early American settlers and the West Indians.

*The sweet potato belongs to the Morning Glory Family (Convolvulaceae). Its scientific name is Ipomoea batatas.

*The yam belongs to the Yam Family (Dioscoreaceae). Its scientific name is Dioscorea Species.

*The confusion between sweet potatoes and yams started when early slaves mistook the sweet potato for a yam (which is grown in Africa). It wasn’t long before sweet potatoes were commonly referred to as yams, especially in the South. Yams are rarely found in American markets. (*Fortunately, we did find yams from Costa Rico a few weeks ago at our local Walmart).

*Many supermarkets use the terms sweet potato and yams interchangeably.

*All crops grown in the U.S. are sweet potatoes with the largest crop grown in North Carolina. Yams are imported from the Caribbean but are difficult to find.

*Other than being from two different plant families, the sweet potato is a storage root and the yam is a tuber. Other differentiating characteristics:

Sweet potato: smooth, with thin skin. Short, blocky shape with a moist, sweet flavor. High in beta carotene (Vitamin A). Propagated by transplanted or vine cuttings with a 3 to 5 month growing season.

Yam: long and cylindrical with a dry and starchy taste. Low in beta carotene. Propagated by tuber pieces with a 6 to 12 month growing season.

*Growing sweet potatoes:

Purchase sweet potatoes for cuttings or slips from local nurseries in late spring. Allow the cuts to scar for a few days and, as with regular potatoes, include 3 or 4 eyes, if not sprouted. Plant the slips or cuttings deep, with at least 3 nodes below ground or 3 to 4” deep and 12 to 16 inches apart.

It’s also fun to try the “second-grade” sweet potato vine method, which is to root a sweet potato suspended in water using toothpicks.

Unlike most vegetable crops, sweet potatoes do not do better with high levels of organic matter. They need loose soil with good drainage…raised beds are ideal. Sweet potatoes are fairly drought tolerant but do appreciate moist soil.

Sweet potatoes demand warm growing conditions. Do not plant until all possibility of frost has passed. As soon as the soil temperature is at least 60˚F, plant 2 inches below the surface. They need at least 8 hours of sun each day for maximum yield.

Ideally, incorporate 1 pound per 100 sf of bed with a complete lawn or garden fertilizer or an organic fertilizer, per instructions, to the soil before planting. Ideal ph is 5.5 to 6.5.

Harvesting:

Generally ready in 90 to 110-120 days. Peak harvest season being October to December. Some say a light frost will sweeten the taste. Harvest before a hard frost.

Sweet potatoes don’t actually mature but are dug when they reach a usable size. Dig very carefully in dry soil. (They may be kept in the ground to continue sizing but should be dug up before the soil temperatures drops below 50˚F to prevent chill injury).

Cut the roots away from the spuds and allow them to dry for 3 to 4 hours in the shade before placing in a warm, humid area to cure for at least 2 weeks, which turns their starches to sugar.

Ideal curing temperature is 80˚-85˚F with 85 to 90% humidity.

Proper Storage:

Ideal storage temperature is 55˚ to 60˚F in darkness with moderate humidity. The average storage life is 4 to 6 months. Allow good air circulation.

Recommended varieties for our area (Zone 8):

Beauregard (perhaps the world’s most popular sweet potato…favored for high yields of uniform, reddish potatoes with tasty, deep-orange flesh that keeps well in storage. Developed at Louisiana State University in 1987), Centennial and Jewel.

Sweet potatoes are not only a nutritious and tasty vegetable, the skin and flesh are excellent sources of fiber. And, this very versatile vegetable, along with the turkey, makes our Thanksgiving feast complete.

Here’s one of our favorite sweet potato recipes to get us started after our recent Grow and Graze event-Pumpkins on Parade, Sweet Potatoes for Adornment.

Sweet Potato Crescent Rolls

 

Ingredients:

2 packages active dry yeast

1 cup warm water (105˚ to 115˚)

1 cup cooked mashed sweet potato

½ cup shortening

½ cup sugar

1 egg

1 ½ teaspoons salt

5 ¼ to 5 ¾ cups all-purpose flour

¼ cup butter, softened

Directions:

  1. Dissolve yeast in warm water in a large mixing bowl; let stand 5 minutes. Add sweet potato, shortening, sugar, egg, and salt; beat at medium speed of an electric mixer until thoroughly blended. Gradually stir in enough flour to make a soft dough.

 

  1. Turn dough out onto a well-floured surface, and knead until smooth and elastic (about 5 minutes). Place in a well-greased bowl, turning to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place (85 degrees), free from drafts, 1 hour or until doubled in bulk.

 

  1. Punch dough down, and divide into 3 equal parts. Roll each into a 12-inch circle on a lightly floured surface; spread each circle with 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon butter. Cut each circle into 12 wedges; roll up each wedge, beginning at wide end. Place on lightly greased baking sheets, point side down, curving slightly to form a crescent.
  2. Cover crescent rolls and let rise in a warm place, free from drafts, 30 to 45 minutes or until rolls are doubled in bulk. Bake at 400˚ 10 to 12 minutes or until light golden brown.

Yield: 3 dozen

More recipes coming!

Linda Alexander

 

 

The Fall Garden You Should Have Already Started

October 11, 2019

I’m late.  I should have been making space for fall vegetables in my 8x 10′ garden in August. My excuse is that the squash and basil were still producing and I had a fervent hope that my cucamelon vines would finally spring forth with those tiny cute cucamelons (alas, it did not).

My good friend, Sheila Kostelny, however, planted her garden in a timely manner. It’s the garden I’ve been dreaming about.

She has planted seeds of beets, carrots, spinach and 3 varieties of peas.

 

And already in the garden are transplants of Bright Lights Swiss Chard, Southern Giant Curled Mustard, Tiger Collards, and garlic.

Below are her Beauregard Sweet Potatoes which are arguably  the world’s most popular sweet potato. It’s popularity comes from producing high yields of uniform, reddish-purple potatoes with tasty, deep-orange flesh.

By the way, Sheila will be teaching how to grow sweet potatoes at our next Grow and Gaze event on October 22. Tickets for the lunch are sold out but the lecture is free and open to anyone who wants to attend.

For anyone else who is just now working on a fall garden, you can purchase transplants of broccoli, beets, Brussel sprouts, cabbage, swiss chard, lettuce, mustard greens, spinach and other cool season crops at your local garden center.

I’ll see you there!

Ann Lamb

 

Edible Landscaping, Here’s What You Plant!

The beautiful and edible Roselle Hibiscus planted in our Greenhouse beds. 

All plant material in the edible landscape is carefully selected for culinary purposes. Whether it be the leaves, flowers, fruit, roots or seeds, at least one part of the plant must be edible. Creating a visually attractive landscape design using only edible plants is the framework for our lovely garden. We hope you enjoy your visit to The Edible Landscape at Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills.

Edible Plants in Our Garden and Some of Their Culinary Uses:

South Sidewalk Raised Beds (Left Side)

Garlic Chives – leaves and blossoms; salads, egg dishes and sauces

Spearmint – leaves; mint syrups, fruit salads, garnish for beverages, use with beef, lamb, English peas, cucumbers, tomatoes and watermelon

Basil – leaves and blossoms; beverages, desserts, egg dishes, pesto and salads

South Sidewalk Raised Bed (Right Side)

Sweet Fennel – leaves; salads, sauces and grilled meats, – seeds; teas and sausage

Okra – pods for sautéing, roasting, frying and sliced raw in salads; leaves for frying

Strawberries – fruit; beverages, desserts, jams, jellies and soups

Trellis

Luffa – young vegetable and flowers; young vegetable can substitute for squash, zucchini or eggplant, flowers can be dipped in batter and sautéed

Clay Pot Bed

Sweet Myrtle – leaves, berries and blossoms; leaves in stews, roast meats, stuffing, salads and meat ragouts, berries as a substitute for black pepper

Dwarf Fig Tree – fruit; preserves, salads, grilled and baked

Stonescape

Mexican Mint Marigold – leaves; fish and poultry cookery, ice creams and teas

Curry Plant – leaves; mix with cream cheese for sandwiches, egg and chicken salads

Society Garlic – leaves; herb butters, egg and cheese dishes, starchy vegetables

Cutting Celery – leaves; dressings, salads and soups

Summer Savory – leaves; vegetable cookery, especially beans 

Italian Parsley – leaves; white sauce, scrambled eggs, baked corn or potatoes, poultry, dressing, biscuits and butter

Swing Set Frame Raised Beds

Pelargoniums (Scented Geraniums) – leaves; desserts, jellies, sugars and teas

West End of Swing Set Frame

Lamb’s Quarters – young, tender leaves for salads

Wire Frame North Side of Swing Set Frame

Anise Hyssop – dried leaves used for teas and seasonings

Lovage – leaves; salads, soups and stews – seeds; crushed or whole can be used like leaves – stems; blanched and eaten like celery

Scarlet Emperor Bean – leaves, blossoms, fruit; leaves cooked or raw, blossoms in salads, fruit (bean) young like green beans, or mature, used like dried beans

Statuary Bed  

Onion Chives – leaves and blossoms; breads, egg dishes, sauces and salads

Pumpkins – pulp and seeds; breads, pancakes, puddings, soups and toasted seeds

Square Raised Bed

Bay Laurel – leaves; seasoning for soups, stews, vegetables and sauces

Peppers – fruit; grilling, jellies, roasting, sauces and stuffing

Crescent Beds

Pineapple Sage; beverages

Sweet Marjoram ‘compacta’; breads, soups, sauces and pasta dishes

Stone Walkway, East Side

Salad Burnet – fresh young leaves in salads and dips

Hügelkultur

Winter Savory – leaves; vegetable cookery, especially beans

Italian Oregano – leaves and flowers; breads, spaghetti sauce, basting meats while grilling, pasta dishes

Artichokes – choke; steamed and sautéed

Strawberries – fruit; beverages, desserts, jams and jellies, soups

Swiss Chard – leaves; frittatas, savory tarts and soups

Wave Wall

French Sorrel – leaves; salads, sauces and soups

Greenhouse Beds

Monarda (Bee Balm) – leaves and blossoms; teas and salads

Lemon Balm – leaves; use as a garnish for summer drinks and salads, teas

German Chamomile – flowers; tea

Roselle Hibiscus– calyx, leaves, seeds; calyx for tea and jam, leaves in salads/stir fry, seeds ground into flour

Cinder Block Front of Greenhouse

Roselle Hibiscus – same as above 

French Tarragon planted in the half moon bed.

Brick Half Moon Bed, North Front of Greenhouse

Lemon Verbena – leaves; beverages, breads, desserts, jam and jellies and salad dressings

Mediterranean Swoop Bed

Pomegranate – flesh and seeds; jellies, salads and sauces 

French Tarragon – leaves; eggs, cheese dishes, sauces for fish, chicken tarragon and a classic in bearnaise sauce 

Thyme – leaves and flowers; stews, leafy vegetables, beef, fish, lamb, pork and poultry cookery, also used to cook with legumes

Culinary Sages (Garden, Purple and TriColor) – leaves and flowers; breads, poultry and pork cookery, thanksgiving stuffing 

Mexican Oregano – leaves and flowers; same as other oreganos

Raised Bed on Concrete Pad

Sweet Potato (Beauregard) – baking, roasting and sautéing for vegetable dishes and desserts

Plant Guild

Hardy Satsuma (Orange Frost) – fruit

Sweet Marjoram – breads, soups, sauces and pasta dishes

Cedar Fence

Sweet Olive (Osmanthus Fragans)- blossoms; dried and used in cakes and sweets 

Ginger – root, leaves; sauces, pickled, baked goods, leaves can be infused to provide a mild ginger flavor (compared to the root)

Linda Alexander

 

Dallas County Master Gardeners and Japanese Maples

Everyone loves Japanese Maples! Dallas County Master Gardeners were able to learn about them from expert, Scott Hubble, at our September meeting last week.

Scott works at Metro Maples in Fort Worth  and shared a wealth of information about these trees which come in all shapes, sizes and many colors.

Our Texas sun is the most important factor to consider when picking a location for a Japanese Maple. Morning sun with shade in the afternoon is generally perfect.

Japanese Maples are well situated when they are under the canopy of larger trees receiving dappled light throughout the day.

Remember they do not like soggy roots so plant them in areas with drainage.

No more words, let’s gaze at these beauties.

Look carefully inside this Japanese Maple to see homeowner’s mailbox. This  25-30 year old tree grew around the mailbox.

Thank you Metro Maples for the presentation and pictures.

Ann Lamb

All Master Gardener meetings are  held the 4th Thursday of the month at varying locations are open to the public.

Tool Time and education for all Thursday, October 3rd at 10am at The Raincatcher’s Garden. Click here for details.

Don’t forget to visit the Red Maple Rill at the Dallas Arboretum with over 80 varieties of signature Red Maples.

 

Grow and Graze-Pumpkins on Parade, Sweet Potatoes for Adornment – TIME CHANGE

“Pumpkins on Parade, Sweet Potatoes for Adornment”

PLEASE NOTE: Start time has been move back a half hour to begin at 10:30. Traffic on nearby streets, particularly Preston, Royal and Walnut Hill is difficult to navigate because of storm debris. Midway is open north of the garden and south to at least Royal Lane. Please allow extra travel time, and we hope to see you at the garden!

Tickets are sold out but the class is free, so please join us!

Join us for an in-depth look into these harvest-season jewels that have become an intrinsic part of classic autumn fare.

Tuesday, October 22nd

A ‘Grow and Graze’ Event Hosted by the Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills

10:30 – 11:30am * 11001 Midway Road * Church Sanctuary

Free Program by Raincatcher’s Vegetable Experts

Immediately following the program, please join us in the Community Hall for Lunch

11:30 – 12:30

$15 per person, Reserved seating for 60, Ticket Sales Begin September 24th

Deadline Tuesday, October 8th

For Lunch Tickets, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pumpkins-on-parade-sweet-potatoes-for-adornment-tickets-72885583743

 (Master Gardeners earn two CEU’s if attending both events)

Menu

Curried Pumpkin Hummus with Toasted Pita Chips

Autumn Bisque

Harvest Salad with Bacon Vinaigrette

Sweet Potato and Black-eyed Pea Salad with Rosemary-Honey Vinaigrette

Sweet Potato Crescent Rolls

Maple Sweet Potato Bread Pudding

Pumpkin Chai Pots de Crème Garnished with Pumpkin Seed Brittle

Orange-Scented Water and Hazelnut Coffee

Linda Alexander

Fall, Bring It On!

   My garden has begun to greet me in the morning feeling a little more perky in the cool air of fall and I too breathe a sigh of relief from the relentless heat of August. My smile is soon replaced with a frown as I survey the damage from my little friend, a small bunny that has ignored my no trespassing signs.

Maybe you are like me and mourn the end of summer’s offerings especially tomatoes and peaches but I know their demise makes room for fall blessings like spinach, kale (which my husband refuses to nibble unlike my bunny) and broccoli.

Goodbye summer, It’s time to pull out our fall garden calendars and dig in. I’m hoping you are able to read this article, Gardeners Learn to See Time Differently from the Washington Post by Joanne Kaufman.

She reminds us that we are governed by the vagaries of the planting season and the rhythms of the garden.

Above: Fall garden seed packets, my favorite is Parris Island Cos Lettuce.

In Texas, now is the time to scrape away some of our worn out, burned up plants and prepare for fall. The next few months are an especially rewarding time to garden in Dallas.

Ann Lamb

Planting Times for North Central Texashttp://dallas-tx.tamu.edu/files/2010/06/Vegetable-Planting-Guide.pdf

North Haven Gardens Vegetable Planting Dateshttps://www.nhg.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/NTxVegPlanting.pdf

 

Fall Garden Class

September 5th at 10am at The Raincatcher’s Garden- Native and Adaptive Plants, click here for more info.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grow and Graze with Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills

Salad Gardens

Did you know that “salads” have been a part of humankind’s diet for thousands of years? Even the ancient Greeks and Romans made lettuces a part of their daily meals. Learn how to raise healthy, nutritious food that can be picked and eaten at its peak of flavor.

Tuesday, March 19th, 10:00 – 11:30am

Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills * 11001 Midway Road

Instructor: Jeff Raska, Dallas County Horticulture Program Assistant, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

The class is free – no reservation required. The public is welcome, and Master Gardeners earn a one-hour education credit.

Immediately following Jeff’s presentation in the church sanctuary, you are invited to join us in the Community Hall for a …

Salad Bar Smorgasbord of Garden Delights

Choose from an array of textures, shapes, colors and flavors even Peter Rabbit would envy. Use your imagination to create your very own culinary masterpiece. Toss your creation with an assortment of dressings, crunchy vegetables and a few surprise toppings.

Garden Salad with Caramelized Almonds and Mandarin Oranges

Mixed Green Salad with Nasturtiums and Raspberry Vinaigrette

Fresh Spinach and Tatsoi Salad with Orange Curry Dressing

Orange Fennel Watercress Salad

Creamy Leek and Sorrel Soup

“Jump in” and finish your feast with a chomping delicious piece of Chocolate Beet Cake or that sneaky little rabbit’s ultimate pleasure…Blue Ribbon Carrot Cake

Lunch reservations must be received by Tuesday, March 12

$15 person, limited to 60

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/salad-gardens-tasting-luncheon-tickets-56498368140

Future 2019 classes, no reservations yet but you can save these dates on your calendar:

June 18th… Herbs of the Mediterranean

August 27th… Corn, the Golden Essence of Summer, and Okra, a Garden Giant

October 22nd …Seasonal Splendor, Pumpkins and Sweet Potatoes

 

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