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Tag Archives: Dallas Farm to Table

Thai Basil Sorbet, a Cool Taste of Summer

Thai Basil Sorbet

When one mentions ‘basil’, immediately people think of Italian-type basil – the Genovese variety that is used for pesto and caprese salad.  Thai basil, if it’s thought about at all, is best known as a garnish in the popular Vietnamese soup pho.

But with its spicy licorice and lemon notes, this cousin of mint works well in desserts, too.  Any variety of Thai basil can be used – we have both Persian and Cardinal cultivars in the Edible Landscape and both worked equally well.

An ice cream maker does its magic by keeping the ice crystals small while they’re being created.  If you don’t have an ice cream maker or aren’t in the mood for sorbet, there are other ways you can enjoy this syrup.  You can make a granita or popsicle if you still want an icy treat, or simply take the syrup you’ve made and pour it over a white cake, brownies, or even the olive oil semolina cake from our Grow and Graze event – it’ll infuse the cake with a lovely extra layer of flavor!

Above: Cool and refreshing Thai Basil Sorbet

The recipe below makes about a pint of sorbet – feel free to multiply it and make more.

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups water

1 cup sugar (192 g)

1 cup basil (leaves and/or blossoms) (about 55 g)

2 Tablespoons corn syrup*

2 Tablespoon lime juice

*The corn syrup is to keep the sorbet from becoming a popsicle without making the sorbet too sweet.  The alternative to the corn syrup would be a tablespoon of vodka (or rum).  If you’re not making sorbet, but the granite, popsicle, or syrup, you don’t need the corn syrup (or vodka or rum).

METHOD for SORBET:

Bring the sugar and water to a boil, dissolving the sugar.  Add the basil leaves and cover.  Let come to room temperature, and then store in the refrigerator until chilled (you can go 30 minutes to 2 days).

Once it’s chilled, strain out the basil leaves, and add the corn syrup and lime juice.

Spin it in your ice cream maker using the manufacturer’s instructions, then put in the freezer to finish hardening off.

METHOD for GRANITA:

Bring the sugar and water to a boil, dissolving the sugar.  Add the basil leaves and cover.  Let come to room temperature, and then store in the refrigerator until chilled (you can go 30 minutes to 2 days).

Once it’s chilled, strain out the basil leaves, and add the lime juice.  Don’t use the corn syrup.

Place the syrup in a shallow pan (metal is good, but something it would be okay to scratch with a fork, or use a plastic container) in the freezer for about a half hour.  Pull it out and with a fork, scrape the frozen portions into large flakes.  Return to the freezer and repeat 2-3 times or until the whole thing is a bunch of frozen flakes.  Cover, and store in freezer until ready to serve.  When you go to serve, use that fork again to make sure you’ve got flakes!

METHOD for POPSICLES:

Bring the sugar and water to a boil, dissolving the sugar.  Add the basil leaves and cover.  Let come to room temperature, and then store in the refrigerator until chilled (you can go 30 minutes to 2 days).

Once it’s chilled, strain out the basil leaves, and add the lime juice.  Don’t use the corn syrup.

Pour into popsicle molds and freeze!  This is a pretty intense way to enjoy the basil flavor – I’d suggest adding some berries to the mold and have a berry basil popsicle.

METHOD for SYRUP (over cakes, brownies, etc.):

Bring the sugar and water to a boil, dissolving the sugar.  Add the basil leaves and cover.  Let come to room temperature, and then store in the refrigerator until chilled (you can go 30 minutes to 2 days).

Once it’s chilled, strain out the basil leaves, and add the lime juice.  You don’t need the corn syrup for this use, but it won’t hurt your final product, either.

The Edible Landscape Team

Pictures by Starla Willis

 

Protecting Fig Trees and Grapes

July 20, 2019

To protect your fig trees from hungry birds, cover the tree canopy with bird netting.  The netting operation needs to be completed before the fruit begins to ripen. Timing is critical. Generally the birds leave unripened fruit alone but once the fig or grape shows color they are all in for their feast and little will be left for you.

This was our project last week at Raincatcher’s. We were lucky enough to have Captain in the US Army and Dallas County Master Gardener, Jon Maxwell, leading us.

Netting for the fig was from Lowes; netting for the grapes was purchased on line as it needed to be larger, 28′ x 28′ vs 14′ x 14′ from box stores.

Jon’s tips for bird netting application-have a lot of help and keep your fig tree pruned short.

Above you see Jim Miller, Jon Maxwell and one of our Dallas County Master Gardeners interns at work.

Annette Latham is a steady help with the net in the top picture.

The netting was large enough to basically hang to the ground, so heavy objects were placed at the bottom  to help hold it in place.  Mockingbirds, who love figs and grapes, have been quite furious!!

Written by Ann Lamb as explained by Jon Maxwell

Pictures by Starla Willis


Looking forward to fig harvest? Here’s few fig recipes from last year’s Grow and Graze event

Don’t forget Grilled Figs with Thyme Honey and Gorgonzola Toasts.

By the way, if you are interested in the Dallas County Master Gardener program, call our help desk at 214- 904 -3053 or go to our website here. Classes start in January when it’s cool!

 

Herbs of the Mediterranean Recipes

 

Iced Herb Gazpacho

This recipe first appeared in the Dallas County Master Gardener Association cookbook, ‘A Year on the Plate’ and on our blog in 2016. It remains our very favorite for recipe for gazpacho. The addition of 5 fresh herbs gathered from the garden give it an exciting boost of flavor.

 

 

 

Ingredients

6 large tomatoes, quartered (peel, if desired)

4 cloves fresh garlic, pressed

¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

¼ cup red wine vinegar

¼ cup olive oil

½ cucumber, peeled and chopped

2 scallions, chopped

1 sorrel leaf, deveined and coarsely chopped

2 sprigs fresh basil

3 sprigs salad burnet

3 sprigs cilantro

3 sprigs parsley

Salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

Cucumber slices and fresh thyme sprigs for garnish

Directions

Roughly puree tomatoes, garlic, cucumber, red pepper flakes, vinegar and oil in the workbowl of a food processor.  Leave some texture to the ingredients.

Add the herbs and pulse just until chopped.  Do not “blend” or mixture will become too brown.

Refrigerate overnight to allow flavors to blend.  Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature.  Garnish with a cucumber slice and a fresh thyme sprig.

Every Herb Pesto

When selecting recipes for our cookbook, the testing committee concluded that this was the most delicious pesto they had ever tasted. A perfect combination of seven garden-fresh herbs elevates the flavor profile to superior status. (Chervil is the ‘tricky’ herb. Early to late fall, and then again in spring, is when you typically find it growing in our garden).

Ingredients:

½ cup Marcona almonds, toasted

2 cloves garlic, peeled

1 cup fresh spinach leaves

½ cup grated Parmesan cheese

½ cup fresh cilantro leaves

½ cup fresh parsley leaves

¼ cup basil leaves

¼ cup fresh tarragon leaves

⅛ cup fresh mint leaves

1 tablespoon fresh chervil leaves

2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

Zest of lemon

Juice of 1 lemon

¾ cup canola oil

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper

Garlic-rubbed crostini, optional

Heirloom tomatoes, chopped, optional

Directions:

  1. Blend the almonds and garlic in a food processor until fine. Add the spinach, cheese, herbs, lemon zest and lemon juice to the food processor.  Blend the herbs just enough so they are mixed, about 3 seconds.
  2. Add the canola oil and olive oil while the food processor is on a low setting. Season with salt and pepper. Blend to desired consistency.
  3. Transfer the pesto to a serving bowl. Place the chopped tomatoes on top of the crostini if using and top with pesto.

Yield: 2 cups

Note:  Any leftover pesto should be placed in a bowl and covered with plastic wrap.  Press the plastic wrap right on top of the pesto and refrigerate.

Above: Swiss Chard and Black Olive Tart

Black Olive and Swiss Chard Tart

In her beloved cookbook, ‘Pedaling Through Provence’, Sarah Leah Chase takes you on a technicolor journey through the sun-blessed cuisine of the Mediterranean. She calls this savory version of the tart, “love at first and last bite”.

 

Pastry Ingredients

1 ¼ cups unbleached all-purpose flour

1 ½ tablespoons minced fresh rosemary

Pinch of sea or coarse salt

8 tablespoons (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

2 teaspoons imported Dijon mustard

2 to 3 tablespoons ice water

Filling Ingredients

1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), washed, stems and thick center ribs removed, leaves patted dry

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 large onion, minced

3 cloves garlic, minced

½ teaspoon dried thyme

Pinch of grated nutmeg

½ cup freshly grated Gruyere cheese

2 large eggs

½ cup light cream or half-and-half

Sea or coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

2 cups pitted Nyons or Kalamata olives

2 tablespoons pine nuts

Directions

Make the pastry: Place the flour, rosemary, salt, and butter in a food processor and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the mustard and enough ice water so that the dough begins to form a ball as the machine is pulsed on and off. Gather the dough into a flat disk, wrap it in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the filling. Cut the Swiss chard leaves into ½-inch-wide strips. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté until soft and translucent, 7 to 10 minutes.  Add the chard, garlic, thyme, and nutmeg. Cook until the chard leaves have wilted and any water given off has evaporated, 5 to7 minutes. Remove from the heat and gently mix in the cheese.

Beat the eggs and cream together in a mixing bowl and then fold in the chard mixture, blending well. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 400˚F.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the chilled pastry dough to form a 12- to 13-inch circle. Transfer to an 11-inch tart pan and trim and crimp the edges decoratively. Spread the chard filling evenly in the tart shell. Arrange the olives in concentric circles over the top, pressing lightly into the filling. Sprinkle the pine nuts in between the olives.

Bake the tart until the crust is golden and the filling is set, 30 to 40 minutes. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.

Yield: Serves 6 to 8 as a luncheon or 12 to 14 as an appetizer.

Green Herbs and Butterhead Lettuce Salad

This recipe and the  from award-winning cookbook author, Georgeanne Brennan, inspired us to get busy growing, harvesting and using herbs daily. While one delicate herb, sweet cicely, succumbed to our summer heat, plans are to include it in our fall garden. Stay posted for updates.

Ingredients

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon chopped shallot

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice or red wine vinegar

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 head butterhead lettuce, leaves separated

1 cup fresh chervil sprigs

½ cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

¼ cup small, tender fresh sorrel leaves

Directions

In the bottom of a salad bowl, combine the olive oil and shallot and stir together. Whisk in the lemon juice or vinegar. Taste for balance. Add the salt and pepper and taste again, adjusting as desired.

Tear the lettuce leaves into bite-sized pieces, and put them into the bowl along with the chervil, parsley and sorrel. When ready to serve, toss well.

Yield: Serves 3 or 4

Herb-Seasoned Croutons

Ingredients

8 slices day-old coarse country bread, each about 1 inch thick

¼ cup extra-virgin oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

½ teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme

1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon minced fresh oregano or sweet marjoram

Directions

Without removing the crusts, cut the bread slices into 1-inch cubes. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté until translucent, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the bread cubes, reduce the heat to low and cook slowly, turning once, until golden and crusty, 4 to 5 minutes on each side.

Sprinkle the cubes with the salt, thyme, rosemary and oregano or marjoram. Turn a few times in the pan to coat evenly. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the croutons to paper towels to drain and cool. To store, put in a paper bag, fold the top over several times and keep for up to 1 week.

Yield: Makes About 32 Croutons, About 4 Cups

 

Raincatcher’s Garden Summer Ratatouille

There are countless recipes for Ratatouille. However, this simple and colorful version ‘wowed’ guests at our ‘Herbs of the Mediterranean’ Grow and Graze event. Don’t let summer pass without making this one!

Ingredients

3-4 baby eggplants

3-4 medium tomatoes

1 yellow zucchini squash

1 green zucchini squash

1 yellow straight-neck squash

2-3 shallots

Olive oil, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Endless Summer Tomato Sauce

Several sprigs of fresh oregano

Directions

Pour 1 cup of tomato sauce into the bottom of an 8- to 9-inch baking dish.

Using a mandolin, slice first six ingredients thinly and evenly approximately ¼” thick. Make mini stacks using one of each sliced vegetable. Arrange a few stacks at a time into the prepared baking dish forming concentric spirals from the outer edge to the center. Fan out slightly allowing top part of vegetables to be seen. Use any leftover slices to fill the center.

Drizzle with a small amount of olive oil and season with fresh pepper. Bake at 350˚F until vegetables are just soft to the touch but not overcooked. Check at 20 minutes.

Options: Fill center with goat cheese just as dish comes out of the oven. Spoon sauce over the top and serve with a crusty slice of bread.

Olive Oil Cake

You seldom here about this intensely moist and flavorful cake served during the dessert course. We hope to change you mind.  Restaurant owners, Jennifer and David Uygur  shared their recipe in the Dallas Morning News. Each slice was topped with a generous dollop of lavender-infused whipped cream and a sprinkling of fresh, locally grown blueberries.

Ingredients

2 cups flour

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon baking powder

¼ teaspoon sea salt

3 large eggs

1 ½ cups sugar

1 cup fruity olive oil

1 ½ cups whole milk

3 tablespoons microplaned mixed citrus zest (lemon, orange, grapefruit)

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme leaves

Directions

Heat oven to 360˚F (this is correct) if using a 10- to 12-cup Bundt pan.

Heat oven to 350˚F if using a 10-inch cake pan with removable bottom.

Sift flour, baking soda, baking powered and salt together into a medium bowl. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the eggs with the sugar, then add the oil and mix until homogeneous.

Add the milk, zest and thyme. Gently mix in the flour and pour into a greased and floured 10- to 12-cup Bundt pan. (If using a 10-inch cake pan with removable bottom, grease, line with a parchment circle, then grease again and flour).

Bake for about 45 to 50 minutes, until a tester comes out clean (baking times vary depending on oven and pans, so keep an early eye on it). Place on a rack to cool. After 10 minutes turn cake out of the pan onto rack and let cool completely. Slice and serve on a plate. Garnish with your choice of toppings; whipped cream, whipped crème fraiche, fresh berries, sliced peaches or apricots.

Yield: Makes 12 servings.

Linda Alexander

 

 

 

Grow and Graze, Herbs of the Mediterranean

Herbs of the Mediterranean can and should be grown in Dallas, Texas. Embrace our hot and usually dry climate to grow the herbs of France, Greece, Italy and Spain.  Herbs like rosemary, lavender, thyme, and oregano thrive in Dallas gardens. Ounce for ounce, many herbs used to flavor foods have more antioxidant power than berries, fruits, and vegetables according to a recent agricultural study.  The herbs with the highest antioxidant activity are in the oregano family.

Last week Dallas County Master Gardener, Marian Buchanan, came to teach us about these herbs and afterwards guests enjoyed  an herb inspired lunch.

 

Above: Our centerpiece of fennel, sage, rosemary, lavender, sorrel, and tarragon

Some of our guests were kind enough to tell us what they thought about the day:

“I’m not a gardener at all and was afraid the presentation would be clinical or over my head. It was so much fun. There was something for everyone, details that a professional would enjoy as well as useful, interesting information for anyone. Then, the food. It was filling and flavorful and so much more interesting after having learned a bit about each of the herbs and herb combinations. I hope to come again.”Chris Bradshaw

“Thoroughly enjoyed & highly recommend Raincatcher’s gardeners’ events. Learned so much about the planting & care of herbs, many of which were on the menu of our delicious lunch. And Beverly was the best hostess when afterwards she took a small group of us on a tour of their amazing, beautiful & peaceful gardens.” A Fan

 

I appreciated the useful information about each herb (varieties, preservation, use in cooking) and helpful growing tips. The volunteers at Raincatcher’s did a stellar job organizing a delightful lecture and lunch.” Kateri Allen


Thank you to everyone who worked so hard clipping and snipping and tying bundles of herbs and cooking, decorating, teaching and organizing.

Above: Dallas County Master Gardeners smiling and ready to serve at the  ‘Grow and Graze’ event

In the next few days, we will share recipes and pictures. Here’s the list of herbs featured.

Linda Alexander and Ann Lamb

Picture by Starla Willis

 

Herbs of the Mediterranean, A Grow and Graze Event

Herbs of the Mediterranean

Herbs activate our senses. Join us for a culinary trip to the Mediterranean where we’ll explore some of the world’s best tasting food. Be inspired by this delightfully aromatic way of using fresh and dried herbs in your cooking.

Tuesday, June 25th

A “Grow and Graze” Event Hosted by

 The Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills

Time:  10:00 – 11:00

Location:  11001 Midway Road Church Sanctuary

Instructor: Marian Buchanan, Dallas County Master Gardener, Herb Specialist

(Master Gardeners earn two CEU’s)

Immediately following the program, please join us at our Mediterranean Table

Lunch: 11:15 – 12:30

$15 per person, Reserved seating for 60 available starting May 20th. Deadline June 18th

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/herbs-of-the-mediterranean-tickets-60462949309

Menu

Iced Herb Gazpacho and Toasted Baguette Slices spread with Every Herb Pesto

Black Olive & Swiss Chard Tart

Green Herbs & Butterhead Lettuce Salad with Herb-Seasoned Croutons

Salad of New Potatoes with Sweet Cicely, Lovage and Green Peppercorns

Mediterranean Summer Roasted Vegetable Ratatouille

Honey-Lemon Olive Oil Cake with Whipped Crème Fraiche and Fresh Berries

Lavender Honey Ice Cream

All members of the public invited for the free lecture. To make a reservation for the lunch use the eventbrite link above.

Linda Alexander

The Edible Landscape Adds a Food Guild

April 30, 2019

The idea of a food guild or food forest is interesting because it is a less labor intensive way to grow food and more sustainable. Everyone likes the idea of low maintenance and more crops, so watch this video to see the food guild we are creating to in our Edible Landscape at The Raincatcher’s Garden.

The food guild utilizes layers of different types of plants. We are fortunate to have towering oak trees for our tall tree layer and also fortunate to have tasted acorn muffins made from acorn flour. So yes, our tall tree layer, the live oak tree is a food source. Next we will have a short tree, a vine will grow up that tree, then a shrub layer, an herb layer, ground cover and a root crop like horseradish or carrots.  As you read this, you should be getting the idea of plants growing together and utilizing each other’s strengths to create this sustainable food guild.

It’s a fascinating concept and you will get to hear of it’s successes and trials, as we watch it over the next few years.

Ana has given us a list of the plants we will be considering for The Raincatcher’s Food Guild. I’m excited about the mandarin orange tree.

Ann Lamb

video by Starla Willis

For more information about planting a food guild click here.

Planting Corn at The Raincatcher’s Garden

April 15, 2019

We are banking on a good crop of corn this year. After all, we have plenty of sun and warm, rich soil and dedicated gardeners staking out our new garden bed.

Let’s get those corn kernels in the ground!

You can almost taste summer when looking at the seed packages.

Sugarbaby

Buttergold

Early Sunglow

Hwy, what do gardeners say after a corn harvest  when receiving a complement about their corn crop?

Aww shucks, thank you!

Ann Lamb

Pictures by Starla Willis

 

To learn about Glass Gem corn, read Christmas in July.

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