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Butterflies at Raincatcher’s Garden, Fall 2018

Where have all the butterflies gone? We enjoyed so many this fall in our garden.

Monarch butterfly sipping nectar from Tithonia, Mexican Sunflower.

Cloudless Sulphur butterfly on a canna in our color wheel.

Queen butterfly alight Lantana, Miss Huff.

American Snout on an Okra blossom.

By late November, most butterflies have bred and died. Their  offspring  overwinter in egg, larva, or chrysalis form until next spring.

 Some adult butterflies have gone farther south and some overwinter in Dallas as adults.  Monarch migration is perhaps the most well knows but also  the Painted Lady, Common Buckeye, American Lady, Red Admiral, Cloudless Sulphur, Skipper, Sachem, Question Mark, Clouded Skipper, Fiery Skipper and Mourning Cloak  migrate to warmer regions.
Ann Lamb
Pictures by Starla Willis. Thank you, Starla!

Fascinating news from the Native Plant Society-click to read their newsletter.

Recipes from the Apples, Pears, Persimmons, Pomegranate Lunch

Nature’s grand finale plated!

Bake Brie with Roasted Persimmons

Ingredients

2 (8-ounce) wheels of Brie, rinds intact

Roasted Persimmons, chopped (recipe follows)

1 large egg

2 tablespoons water

1 (17.3-ounce) package frozen puff pastry, thawed

Seasonal fruit

Crackers

Directions

Preheat oven to 350˚F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Cut 1 wheel of Brie in half horizontally. Place half of Roasted Persimmons on one half of Brie, and top with remaining half. Repeat with remaining wheel of Brie and remaining Roasted Persimmons.

In a small bowl, whisk together egg and 2 tablespoons water.

On a lightly floured surface, roll puff-pastry sheet to ⅛-inch thickness. Place 1 Brie round on puff pastry; fold pastry over Brie, cut away excess dough, and invert Brie onto prepared baking sheet. Repeat with remaining Brie and puff pastry. Using an acorn-shaped cutter, cut 2 acorns from remaining dough. Using a pastry brush, brush dough with egg wash. Place 1 acorn on each Brie round, pressing gently to adhere; brush with egg wash.

Bake until pastry is golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from oven, and let cool for 10 minutes. Serve with seasonal fruit and cracker.

Yield: Makes 10 to 12 servings

Roasted Persimmons

Ingredients

¼ cup maple syrup

¼ cup granulated sugar

¼ cup brandy

¼ teaspoon salt

1 vanilla bean, halved lengthwise

4 cardamom pods

4 whole cloves

2 star anise

2 cinnamon sticks

4 persimmons, blanched, peeled, and quartered

Directions

Preheat oven to 450˚F.

In a cast-iron or ovenproof skillet, combine syrup, sugar, brandy, salt, vanilla bean, cardamom, cloves, star anise and cinnamon sticks. Add persimmons.

Roast until fruit is tender, about 20 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool completely.

Remove persimmons, discarding spices and vanilla bean. Chop persimmons. Cover and refrigerate for up to 5 days.

Yield: Makes 2 cups

 

Butternut Squash-Pear Soup garnished with Parmesan and Chopped Rosemary

Butternut Squash-Pear Soup

Ingredients

1 (2.5-pound) butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and chopped into 2-inch pieces

2 cloves garlic

¼ cup vegetable oil, divided

1 tablespoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper, divided

1 ½ cups chopped onion

1 shallot, minced

1 quart chicken broth

2 cups half-and-half

1 tablespoon fresh chopped rosemary

2 teaspoons fresh minced ginger

6 ripe Bartlett pears, peeled, cored, and chopped

Garnish: shaved Parmesan cheese, fresh rosemary

Directions

Preheat oven to 450˚F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil, and coat foil with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, combine squash and garlic. Toss with 2 tablespoons oil. Season with salt and ½ teaspoon pepper.

Transfer squash mixture to prepared pan. Bake until tender, 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from oven, and let cool.

In a Dutch oven, heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and shallot, and cook, stirring often, until tender, about 8 minutes. Add squash mixture, chicken broth, and remaining ½ teaspoon pepper Bring mixture to a boil; reduce heat to medium and simmer for 20 minutes.

Add half-and-half, rosemary, and ginger, stirring to combine. Continue to simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat, and let cool slightly. Add pears to mixture.

In the container of a blender, puree mixture, working in batches, until smooth. Return mixture to pan, and simmer over medium heat for 10 minutes. Garnish with Parmesan and rosemary, if desired.

Yield: Makes 8 servings

Figs, Pomegranates, Persimmons and Pear Salad

Salad of Figs, Pomegranates, Persimmons and Pears

Ingredients

½ cup walnut halves

2 large heads frisee, carefully rinsed and stems trimmed

1 Fuyu persimmon, cut into thin slices

1 Red Bartlett pear, halved, cored and cut into thin slices

6 fresh figs, halved through the stem end

Directions

Preheat oven to 350˚F. Spread the walnuts on a baking sheet and toast until lightly browned and fragrant, 5-7 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool.

Arrange the frisee, sliced persimmon and pear, and fig halves on individual plates, dividing them equally. Sprinkle with toasted walnuts. Alternately, arrange salad on a large platter.  Drizzle with the Pomegranate Salad Dressing.

Yield: Serves 4

Pomegranate Salad Dressing

Ingredients

½ cup Pomegranate Syrup (see recipe)

¼ cup olive oil

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

1 tablespoon lemon juice

⅛ teaspoon salt

Directions

Combine all ingredients in a jar; cover tightly and shake vigorously. Chill.

Yield: ⅔ cup

Pomegranate Syrup

Ingredients

4 cups pomegranate seeds (4 large pomegranates)

3 ½ cups sugar

Directions

Combine seeds and sugar in a large glass bowl; cover and chill at least 8 hours.

Transfer mixture to a heavy non-aluminum saucepan; bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat, and simmer 3 minutes.

Pour mixture through a cheesecloth-lined colander; press against sides of colander with back of a spoon to squeeze out juice. Discard pulp.

Pour juice into a 1-quart sterilized jar; cover with lid, and screw on band. Cool; store in refrigerator up to 2 weeks.

Yield: 3 cups

Persimmon Cookies

Persimmon Cookies

Ingredients

2 large ripe persimmons, peeled and coarsely chopped

1 cup sugar

⅔ cup vegetable oil

1 large egg

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 cup raisins

1 cup chopped walnuts

1 cup sifted powdered sugar

3 tablespoons lemon juice

Directions

Position knife blade in food processor bowl; add persimmon, and process until smooth, stopping once to scrape down sides. Measure 1 cup pulp.

Combine pulp, sugar, oil, and egg, stirring until smooth.

Combine flour, soda, and cinnamon in a large bowl; add persimmon mixture, stirring until blended. Stir in raisins and walnuts.

Drop dough by rounded teaspoonfuls onto lightly greased cookie sheets.

Bake at 375˚F for 9 minutes. Transfer to wire racks placed on wax paper. Combine powdered sugar and lemon juice, stirring until smooth; drizzle over warm cookies. Cool.

Yield: 5 dozen

Autumn Orchard Crisp

Ingredients

3 pounds firm, flavorful apples

1 pound pears

Juice of ½ lemon

3 tablespoons granulated sugar

1 cup light brown sugar

1 cup all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut up

1 ½ cups chopped walnuts

½ cup coarsely chopped cranberries

Whipped cream or vanilla ice cream

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350˚F. Butter a 13 x 9-inch baking pan.

Peel, core and slice the apples and pears. Toss them in a bowl with the lemon juice and granulated sugar.

Place the brown sugar, flour, cinnamon, butter, and half the nuts in the bowl of a food processor. Process until blended and crumbly.

Spread one-third of the crumb mixture on the bottom of the prepared pan, top with half of the sliced fruit and scatter over half of the cranberries. Top with the second third of the crumb mixture.

Layer on the remaining sliced fruit and sprinkle over the remaining cranberries. Mix the remaining nuts with the remaining crumb mixture and spread over the top.

Bake until well browned and slightly bubbly, about 1 hour. Cool to warm and top with whipped cream or ice cream.

Yield: Serves 8

Review our horticultural lesson on

apples, pears, poms and persimmons here.

Linda Alexander

Pictures by Starla Willis and Linda Alexander

 

Growing Apples, Pears, Persimmons and Pomegranates

Apples, Pears, Persimmons and Pomegranates, nature’s grand finale!

Jeff Raska, Dallas County Horticulture Program Assistant, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service inspired us to start planting, growing and harvesting the fruits of the season. For Raincatcher’s, it was our last and final class of 2018 in the series.  With an abundance of fall fruits ripe and ready for harvest, we gathered up our pens and paper for a very educational presentation. Highlights from Jeff’s lecture included the following:

General Information for Fruit Trees

Your first consideration should be selecting the right variety for our climate and soils. Plant trees during dormancy, January to early February in a slightly raised mound rich in compost and top-dressed with mulch.  Bare root trees are preferred as they will outgrow a container plant. Want to know if you have a healthy tree? Scratch the root. If it’s the color of cooked spaghetti, it’s a viable tree.

All fruit growth happens within the first 45 days of fruit set (after bloom). At that time, the plant needs constant water (1-3” per week). The fruit won’t get any bigger or sweeter after the first 45 days, it just develops the seed.

In terms of “chill hours,” our Zone 8b previously was between 600-950 hours. Currently we are between 600-800 hours. Our winters are getting colder but shorter due to climate change.

Apples and pears need a cross-pollinator…another tree that blooms at the same time. Both trees grow spurs, short and stout twigs that bear the fruit buds year after year. That’s one reason  you can espalier the tree and have fruit on those limbs. This is in contrast to peaches that bear fruit on new growth every year.

The second consideration is pruning. As a ‘rule-of-thumb’, if you can’t see the fruit then you’re not getting enough sun. Thin the fruit when it’s the size of a nickel. The goal here is to have only 3-4 fruits per limb, spaced about 6 inches apart. Each flower will produce one fruit; too many fruits on a limb will create smaller fruit and risk the branch breaking under the weight.

The third consideration is fertilizer. Instead of fertilizer, mix finished compost into your mound, then top-dress 1-2 times per year. Finished compost is homogenous. When you hold a fistful, there are no telltale leaves or twigs in it. If you do choose to fertilize or use chemicals, don’t use them before a rain event. Rain doesn’t wash the chemicals in, it washes them out. Mulch for weed control. Not only do weeds take nutrients away from the plants, they are a home for the insects that attack the plant.

Apples (Best varieties for the DFW metroplex, with chill hours)

Gala (600)

Mollies Delicious (500-600)

Mutsu (500-900)

Golden Delicious (500-600)

Granny Smith (400-600)

Aim for a variety that has about 600 chill hours. A tree that has more, or less, will live but won’t bear fruit. When is the fruit ripe? Look for green that is starting to add color, or if a bird pecks at it. If you cut it open and find a black seed, it’s ripe. If the seed is green, it is not yet completely ripe.

Pears

(Best varieties for the DFW metroplex, with chill hours)

European varieties:

Warren (600)

Moonglow (700)

Ayers (600)

Asian varieties:

Shinko (500)

Shin Li (500)

In addition to chill hours, these varieties are resistant to fire blight. *Bartlett is especially vulnerable to fire blight and strongly not recommended for this area. All the above varieties can cross pollinate with one another.

Pomegranates

(Best varieties for the DFW metroplex)

Wonderful and Al-sirin-nar

The pomegranate is a part of the crepe myrtle family. It is a wild and unruly bush that needs to grow as a bush and fruits best when not pruned to grow as a tree. However, it can be trimmed to maintain an attractive form. It is self-fertile and doesn’t need another plant for cross-pollination. Pomegranates don’t ripen after being picked. Wait to pick until the fruit is ripe, it should give a little when you squeeze it gently.

Persimmons

(Best varieties for the DFW metroplex)

Eureka (a flat variety, less tannic and can be eaten when firm or soft)

Hachiya (this is the cone-shaped variety, very tannic and only edible when soft)

Based on the variety, persimmons can be self-fertile or need cross-pollination. Persimmon tree branches are thicker and can handle a heavy fruit load.

Immediately following Jeff’s presentation, members and guests were treated to bountiful buffet table bursting with seasonal flavor. It was a feast for both the eyes and the palate.

 A few of the recipes that were developed for this special event will be posted tomorrow:

Baked Brie with Roasted Persimmons

Butternut Squash-Pear Soup garnished with Parmesan and Chopped Rosemary

Salad of Figs, Pomegranates, Persimmons and Pears with Pomegranate Dressing

Autumn Orchard Crisp

Persimmon Cookies

written by Lisa Centala and Linda Alexander from Jeff Rasks’s presentation

 

Sunny Yellow Flowers For Fall Beauty From Raincatcher’s

Our yellow flower tour starts as the cheerful yellow daisy like flowers of zexmenia welcomes visitors to the garden.  It is hard to go wrong with this native plant. Zexmenia asks little beyond a sunny spot with a bit of room to spread.  Butterflies and bees are frequent visitors to the lasting display of clear yellow flowers.

Zexmenia

One need not go far to see the bees enjoying the fuzzy round blooms of the golden lead ball tree. This small tree, native to Texas, has been blooming for months.  The flowers are a bit out of the ordinary and always attract attention.

Fall is the time for the tall yellow cosmos to shine. It is true the tall plants may fall over in wind and rain and it can be over ambitious in seeding itself.  But, no plant is perfect and isn’t it a happy sight? It is well worth overlooking a few things—and bees and butterflies really do love it.

The fast growing well adapted argentine senna is literally covered in lovely yellow flowers.  Some sennas bloom for a short time and seed out to an alarming degree. This one doesn’t. The flowers last for a long time and seeding is not a problem.  If that isn’t enough to make it a favorite—it is also a host plant for those pretty yellow sulfur butterflies.

This yellow rose is part of the trials to try and find plants that resist rose rosette disease.  Let’s all think positive for this little plant with flowers in such a delicate shade of yellow.

Esperanza cannot be left out of any list of favorite yellow flowers.  This plant was almost given up for lost in the Spring—what a come back it seems to have more bright yellow flowers than it has leaves.

Don’t forget that vegetables can be as pretty as they are delicious.  This yellow okra flower is a perfect example.

If your garden could use a little sparkle or if you want to do more to provide the nectar pollinators need to live,  add some , or all, of these lovely yellow and you will do both.

You can see all of these plants at Raincatcher’s garden at Midway Hills Christian Church.  Garden work is on Tuesday mornings and you are always welcome.

Susan Thornbury

Pictures by Starla Willis

 

A Summer Dessert Buffet From the Garden

Dallas County Master Gardeners said farewell to summer with an outside dessert buffet at our monthly meeting, Thursday, September 27th. Beautiful weather that morning teased us into believing that fall was only a whisper away.

Earlier in the summer we harvested gallons of blackberries from the vines in our north garden.  Mid-summer peaches were purchased from local growers. Carefully packaged, our bountiful berries and fruits were sent to the freezer for a brief storage. And then, the cooking began.

Our dessert buffet featured some long-standing favorites:

*Old-Fashioned Blackberry Cobbler

*Old Fashioned Peach Cobbler

*Fresh Peach Pound Cake

*Blackberry Pie Bars

*Fresh Peach Drop Cookies

It was the surprise dessert, however, that took center stage…Lemon Verbena Ice Cream. If you already know about Lemon Verbena but aren’t growing it, now’s the time to reconsider. This ice cream was a real crowd pleaser based on some of the comments we heard as each spoonful was savored by our members:

“Lemony goodness is filling my senses. I want more.”

“Those tiny, little bits of candied lemon rind are popping in my mouth. So refreshing.”

“Creamy texture, divine flavor…please make this again.”

Lemon Verbena Ice Cream Enjoyed by Dorothy!

Lemon Verbena Ice Cream

Ingredients

1 cup milk

1 cup fresh lemon verbena leaves

1 ¾ cups heavy cream

¾ cup sugar

⅛ teaspoon salt

5 egg yolks

¼ cup fresh lemon juice

*¼ cup chopped candied lemon zest

Directions

In a saucepan set over moderate heat bring the milk just to a simmer. Gently crush the lemon verbena leaves in a bowl and add the hot milk. Cover and let steep until milk is cool.

Strain the milk through a sieve into a saucepan, pressing hard on the leaves to extract all flavor. Add the cream, sugar and salt. Bring to a boil, stir once, and remove pan from the heat.

In a bowl whisk the egg yolks, add half of the hot cream mixture, whisking, and pour the egg mixture back into the remaining hot liquid. Cook over moderate heat, stirring, until mixture coats the back of a spoon. Do not let it boil. Stir in the lemon juice and candied zest.

Transfer the mixture to a bowl, let cool, and chill, covered with plastic, until cold.

Transfer the mixture to an ice cream maker and freeze according to manufacturer’s directions.

Yield: about 1 quart

 

*Candied Lemon Zest

Ingredients

4 lemons, well scrubbed

2 cups sugar

1 cup cool water

Directions

Remove zest from lemons with a vegetable peeler, keeping pieces long. Remove white pith using a paring knife. Cut into a fine julienne using a very sharp knife. Place julienned zest in a small bowl; cover with boiling water. Let stand 30 minutes; drain.

Bring sugar and the cool water to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. When sugar is completely dissolved, add julienned zest, reduce heat to medium low, and cook 10 minutes. Remove from heat, cover, and let stand overnight. Drain before using.

Yield: 8 servings

Here’s some information about a well-loved herb, lemon verbena:

Lemon Verbena

Lemon Verbena, Aloysia triphylla syn. Lippia citriodora, is a member of the Verbenaceae family. It is a shrub-like herb with woody stems and bright green, rough-textured pointed leaves, from 1-3 inches long. Leaves grow in whorls of 3 to 4 with an intense lemon scent.  

The bush generally grows around 3-6 feet tall. Plant in full sun in good garden soil. Give it plenty of room to ramble off in different directions or trim slightly, if desired. Either way, you will have an abundance of leaves to use starting in early spring and continuing into fall. In winter lemon verbena will lose its leaves.

Once springtime arrives, you’ll notice tiny little leaves popping out up and down the stems. Your lemon verbena has come out of its dormant stage and it is ready to welcome the new season. This might be a good time to give it a shapelier look.

Enjoy its crisp, clean lemon taste as a substitute in any recipe calling for lemons. Use its fresh leaves chopped up in cakes, cookies and glazes. Drop a sprig or two in your tea and relax with a delightfully lemon-scented herb that should be in everyone’s garden.

Linda Alexander


The next Dallas County Master Gardener meeting will be October 25   at Walnut Hill United Methodist Church and don’t forget our fall garden tour on October 13th. Tickets can be purchased ahead online for $15 or for $20 on the day of the tour at any of the garden locations. More information here.

All members of the public are invited to both events!

Lemon Verbena-no calories, no guilt info here!

 

 

Brussel Sprouts

As master gardeners, we really dig a good reason to gather around the table. When delicious, garden-fresh food is involved we’re “all in”. That’s what happened a few weeks ago when we surprised our Raincatcher’s team leader, Lisa Centala, with a ‘bring your favorite dish’ salad buffet for her special birthday.

A tantalizing line up of salad bowls and platters was spread out the length of two 8-foot tables. We didn’t hesitate to fill our plates with the most amazing variety of green salads, vegetable salads, chicken salads and more. Approaching the end of the line were Artichoke Bites, Baguette slices spread with basil cream cheese and Hatch chili biscuits. No restraint was shown as evidenced by plates full of our garden-inspired selections.

One particular dish new to many of us and requested by all was the Zesty Brussels Sprouts. True to its name, the apple cider vinegar combined with sugar and horseradish was soaked up by each little sprout. They had just the right amount of zip to satisfy the palate. Kathey Roberts graciously shared the recipe for everyone to enjoy.

Raincatcher’s Iconic Picture of Brussel Sprouts! Agree?

Now is the time to plant Brussels sprouts. With their long maturity date, transplants should be in your garden by October 15th. 

Zesty Brussels Sprouts

Ingredients

2 (10-ounce) bags frozen Brussels sprouts or use fresh from your garden or produce isle

1 ½ cups sugar

1 cup apple cider vinegar

5 Tablespoons prepared horseradish (not cream of horseradish)

Salt to taste

2 teaspoons dry mustard

Directions

Cook the sprouts according to package directions; drain. In a large bowl, mix the sugar, vinegar, horseradish, salt and mustard. Add the sprouts and toss lightly. Refrigerate at least 6 hours or overnight.

For more information about Brussel sprouts and a video about their care read here.

Linda Alexander

By the way, only 6 tickets left for the Apples, Pears, Persimmons and Pomegranates lunch on October 16th.  Lecture is free.

 

Greek Vegan Domaldes Recipe

Judy and Yaiyia (Toney) discussing grape leaves at The Raincatcher’s Garden

You remember Yiayia aka Toney Davrados.  Yiayia is Greek for Grandmother and as any Greek Grandma would-she showed us how to make dolmades at our fabulous July  Grape Lecture and Lunch Event.

Now she has offered us the vegan version:

Yiayia’s Greek Dolmades Vegan Style

*Stuffed Grape Leaves with Rice and Herbs

Stuffed Grape Leaves (Greek Dolmades) are often served as part of a mezé (appetizer) plate.  Too often they come from a can and are not fresh. Fresh Greek Dolmades are far superior to the canned.  These can either be a main dish or an appetizer, depending on your appetite. These small bundles of rice and herbs wrapped in grape leaves are a favorite dish in Greece.

Toney surverys our grape leaves to show us leaves that are smooth on the back make better dolmades.

If you have never tried fresh Greek Dolmades, now is the time. They are very easy to make and so delicious!

*Fresh vine leaves: Blanch tender vine leaves for 2-3 seconds in boiling, salted water. Remove them with a slotted spoon and transfer to a bowl full of very cold water. Place in  colander to drain off water. Use a small sharp knife to remove any stems or tough veins they may have.

*When using bottled Grape Leaves:  To prepare bottled grape leaves, rinse well under cold water to remove the brine.  Place them in a colander (back side up) to drain and hold until ready to use

Ingredients

  • 60-70 tender vine leaves
  • 2 bunches fresh green onions, sliced in to very thin rounds
  • 1 large onion or 2 smaller ones, diced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cup rice
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1 bunch fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch dill, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch mint, finely chopped
  • grated zest of 2 lemons
  • salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • juice from 1 1/2 – 2 lemons

Preparing  filling:

Place a pan over medium to high heat.

Add the green onion, onion and garlic along with ½ the olive oil .

Sauté for 10-15 minutes, until they soften, caramelize nicely and shrink in volume.

Add the rice and sauté for 2-5 minutes.

Add the 1 ½ cup water and stir. Lower heat and simmer for about 5 minutes, until the rice soaks up the water.

When ready, remove from heat and set it aside to rest for at least 10 minutes.

Add the parsley, dill, mint, lemon zest, salt and pepper. Stir to combine.

To assemble:

Spread 4-5 vine leaves, and lemon juice on the bottom of a 22 cm pot. Use any ripped or broken vine leaves.

Place a vine leaf in the palm of your hand or on a cutting board (veins facing up and shiny side down).

Add 1 tablespoon of filling in the center, fold the sides of the vine leaf inward and roll to complete. Review the process here.

Transfer to the pot, placing the stuffed vine leaves in a row, one next to the other.

Repeat the same process for all the vine leaves.

When the first layer has been added, continue with a second and third, if needed until they are all done.

Add the remaining olive oil, and cover the stuffed vine leaves with a plate. This is done so that they don’t fall apart while cooking.

Add the warm or hot water, until they are completely covered.

Simmer for about 40-50 minutes until the rice is done and the vine leaves are tender.

When ready, remove from heat and set them aside to cool in the pot.

Let them cool for a bit, in the pot. They can be served warm or cold and should be enjoyed all on their own!

*Perfect sauce for dolmades

Serve the stuffed vine leaves with yogurt, dill, mint, olive oil and freshly ground pepper.

  • 8oz Yiayia’s Greek strained yogurt
  • 1tsp dill finely chopped
  • 1tsp mint finely chopped
  • 1tbs extra virgin olive oil
  • Fresh ground pepper

Linda Alexander and Ann Lamb

Video by Starla Willis

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