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Tomato Sampler Lunch Recipes From August 1, 2017

Cream of Tomato Soup with Parsley Croutons

Cream of Roasted Tomato Soup with Parsley Croutons

Ingredients:

2 pounds large, ripe tomatoes

Olive oil to coat tomatoes

8 shallots

1 small carrot

1 small fennel bulb

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 cups chicken or vegetable stock

5 to 6 sprigs fresh tarragon

5 to 6 sprigs fresh parsley

Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1 cup heavy cream (optional)

Parsley Croutons:

12 thin slices baguette

Olive oil to generously coat both sides of each piece of baguette

3 cloves garlic, cut in half

½ cup Teleme cheese, grated (or use your favorite semi-soft cheese, such as Brie, Havarti, Monterrey Jack or Port Salut)

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425˚. Cut tomatoes in half, seed them and coat with olive oil. Place tomatoes on a foil lined cookie sheet and bake for 30 minutes, turning every 10 minutes, until the skins begin to darken and blister. Remove from oven and let cool. Remove the skins and reserve the pulp and all the juices.
  2. Coarsely chop the shallots, carrot and fennel. Melt butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat and sauté chopped vegetables until they are very soft. Stir occasionally to prevent sticking. Add the stock and herbs and simmer over low heat for 30 minutes. Add the tomato pulp and reserved tomato juices. Remove the herb sprigs. Puree the soup or run the pulp through a food mill or fine sieve for a smoother soup. Season with salt and pepper and extra herbs, if desired. Keep warm over low heat.
  3. Lower the oven to 400˚. To make the parsley croutons, brush both sides of baguette slices with olive oil and place on a baking sheet. Rub one side of baguette with garlic. Sprinkle with cheese and parsley and bake until brown.
  4. Add the cream to the soup if desired and heat until warm. Ladle soup into warm bowls and float 3 parsley croutons on top of each.

Serves 4

Adapted from TOMATOES, A Country Garden Cookbook by Jesse Cool

 

Summer Cherry Tomato Dressing

Summer Cherry Tomato Dressing

Ingredients:

8 ounces small cherry or other tiny tomatoes, halved or quartered, depending on size

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons drained, oil-packed sundried tomatoes, thinly sliced

1 tablespoon fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced

2 teaspoons drained capers, coarsely chopped

2 teaspoons sherry vinegar

2 teaspoons fresh orange juice

½ teaspoon minced fresh garlic

¼ teaspoon Kosher salt

Directions:

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a small bowl and stir gently to combine. Let sit for 10 to 15 minutes (or up to 30 minutes) to let the flavors mingle and to let the tomatoes marinate some. Stir gently before serving over fresh green salad. May also be refrigerated overnight.

Yield: About 1 ¼ cups

Adapted from Edible Dallas and Fort Worth, Summer 2010

Curried Tomato Pickles

Curried Pickled Tomatoes

Ingredients:

2 pounds unripe green tomatoes

2 medium yellow onions

4 to 5 fresh whole red chili peppers

3 to 4 cups seasoned rice wine vinegar

3 bay leaves

3 cloves garlic

1 teaspoon whole allspice

2 tablespoons curry powder

1 tablespoon whole cumin

Directions:

  1. Sterilize 4 or 5 pint-sized jars by boiling in hot water or running them through the dishwasher without detergent.
  2. Cut tomatoes into wedges. Cut the onions into wedges approximately the same size as the tomatoes. Alternate layers of the onions and the tomatoes in the sterilized jars. Place 1 chili pepper in each jar.
  3. In a large, nonreactive pot, bring all the remaining ingredients to a boil for 5 minutes. Strain and pour evenly over the onions and tomatoes. Let cool.
  4. Add enough liquid to the jars to completely cover the vegetables and reach within ½ inch of the top of the jar. Add more vinegar if more liquid is needed. Cover with the lids and store in the refrigerator. Give them a minimum of a few days before eating. Good for at least 2 months in the refrigerator.

Makes 4 to 5 pints

Adapted from TOMATOES: A Country Garden Cookbook by Jesse Cool

Heirloom Tomato and Fresh Peach Salad

Heirloom Tomato and Fresh Peach Salad over Whipped Burrata Cheese 

Ingredients:

2 heirloom tomatoes, cut into wedges

4 yellow pear tomatoes, cut in half

2 ripe peaches, sliced

2 watermelon radishes, thinly sliced on a mandoline

12 zucchini spirals, thinly sliced longwise on a mandoline

2 tablespoons pine nuts, lightly toasted

16 ounces Burrata cheese (may substitute fresh mozzarella and cream for thinning) 

Directions:

1. Whip Burrata cheese in a food processor until creamy and spreadable.

2. Spread equal amounts of the cheese onto four salad plates, forming a circle.

3. Arrange an even number of tomato wedges, peach slices, radish slices and zucchini spirals on top of the cheese.

4. Sprinkle the pine nuts evenly over each of the four plates. 

Serves 4

Heirloom Tomato and Goat Cheese Tartlett

Recipes and Pictures by Linda Alexander

Editing by Lisa Centala

More Tomato Recipes Tomorrow!

 

Tomato Class and Tomato Sampler, Tuesday, August 1st

Growing Fall Tomatoes

 

There’s still time (just a little…) to get your tomatoes in for a fall crop. Jeff Raska, horticulturalist with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and longtime tomato grower, will share his recipe for success with this garden favorite. We will also have a few extra tomato plants available for sale after the class.

Jeff has helped design a tomato trial, which we are implementing at Raincatcher’s. Our volunteers will plant two of the same variety of tomato into each of three raised beds to demonstrate results from different types of fertilizer: compost, organic and chemical.

Raincatcher’s is a demonstration garden and project of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and Dallas County Master Gardeners located on the campus of Midway Hills Christian Church. To find the fellowship hall, please park in the west parking lot and come through the courtyard to the south church building.

After the class, we will be hosting a tomato sampler lunch with suggested donations of $10 per person. Details below.

Bring a friend, the public is welcome to either or both events.

Lisa Centala

Tuesday, August 1

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills, Fellowship Hall, 11001 Midway Rd, Dallas, TX 75229

 

“Just-picked, Homegrown and Vine-Ripened”

Welcome to the World of Tomatoes!

Join us at the tasting table immediately following Jeff Raska’s presentation…“Growing Fall Tomatoes”

$10.00 per person suggested donation

Menu

Cream of Roasted Tomato Soup with Parsley Croutons

Heirloom Tomato and Fresh Peach Salad over Whipped Burrata Cheese

Summer Cherry Tomato Salad Dressing Tossed with Mixed Greens

Tomato Tart

Curried Pickled Tomatoes

Green Tomato Brown Betty or Tomato Ginger Upside Down Cake

Linda Alexander

Leave a comment on our blog if you have a question!

The Rainbow Garden at Raincatcher’s

If your green thumb is ready to branch out into living color, visit our Rainbow Garden for inspiration and plan on taking lots of photos. You’ll find a colorful mix of flowers and vegetables growing in harmony. In the summer heat, early morning is a good time to stop by. Enjoy iridescent dragonflies and come face to face with giant bees casting their drunken shadows on the garden, touch fuzzy silver green lamb’s ear, and see if you can identify standing cypress. (Hint- it is red.)

See the violet morning glory threaten to take over the purple heart growing beneath it. Compare the many shades of blue flowers and notice the exuberant orange Mexican sunflower. Inhale the aroma of fresh basil and see how the eggplant and strawberries are doing. 

Now take a shady break under the garden’s charming vine-covered entrance arbor and make notes before heading to the nursery to create your own rainbow. The rainbow garden doesn’t get any shade from the hot summer sun and receives only minimal supplemental water so you know these plants can take the heat in your own sunny spots at home. Drop by anytime and let the garden inspire you.

Gail Cook

 Pictures by Starla Willis and Ann Lamb

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The Strange, True and Unappreciated Story of Oak Galls

Insects are as a group complicated and mysterious. Everyone loves dragonflies.  Butterflies have clubs and societies devoted to their protection.  Gardens are designed just to attract them.  There are t-shirts and even jewelry to honor them.  Why every sighting seems to cause joy and excitement.

Oak Galls are amazing and mysterious—but for some reason nothing seems to be done in their honor.

Handfull of Oak Galls

This is not fair–and this is why. Oak galls are made by tiny creatures almost all of these are cynipid wasps.  Just as there are different types of butterfly that will lay eggs on only a specific type of plant, different types of cynipid wasp that will only lay eggs on one type of oak.  The tiny egg produces chemicals that cause the tree to produce the strange growths called galls.  The galls are different for each type of tree.  The larvae hatch inside the gall where they eat and live until they are mature and able to hatch, fly mate and start the process all over again.

<Larvae Centered Inside Oak Gall, Cradled by Pink Fingernails

The galls are hard to see until they fall to the ground. If this happens before the creature is mature the gall can be cut open to reveal the little larvae.  Of course, then it will not become a wasp—but this might be ok—in the interest of science.

The larvae only eat inside the gall. They do not damage any more of the tree.  In fact the tree is almost never harmed by galls.  The adults are wasps, but they do not sting.  The galls themselves can be beautiful like the oak plum galls which do indeed look like little fruits.

Gall formation is unpredictable. Some years there are a lot of them, other years very few.

All in all these are simply little creatures that happen to have developed an amazing way of protecting themselves as they grow to be adults.

Have you ever heard of anyone planting oak trees in hopes of attracting cynipid wasps—it is doubtful. There seem to be no societies to appreciate and protect them.

This needs to change. Look around for oak galls.  Tell your children their wonderful and amazing life story.  Now surely someone could design a great t-shirt!!

Susan Thornbury

Pictures by Starla Willis

Ginkgo Tree Survival After a Hot Summer

Ginkgo Tree Planted in Spring 2015 and Ginkgo Tree Close-Up of Leaves 2016

Thank you, Eric Larner, Master Gardener and Citizen Forester

Video and Pictures by Starla Willis

 

 

I would love to read this book, Ginkgo: The Tree That Time Forgot.

Written by Peter Crane and said to be quite inspiring.  If anyone has read it, please leave a comment. Here’s the review:

Perhaps the world’s most distinctive tree, ginkgo has remained stubbornly unchanged for more than two hundred million years. A living link to the age of dinosaurs, it survived the great ice ages as a relic in China, but it earned its reprieve when people first found it useful about a thousand years ago. Today ginkgo is beloved for the elegance of its leaves, prized for its edible nuts, and revered for its longevity. This engaging book tells the rich and engaging story of a tree that people saved from extinction—a story that offers hope for other botanical biographies that are still being written.

And to think, we have a specimen doing it’s best to survive in our garden!

Ann Lamb

If you need help watching this video, click here.

Pick a new landscape tree.

Gardening on a Shoestring!

Gardening on a Shoestring:

Confessions of a Frugal Gardener

Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at 11:00 am

Location:The Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills

11001 Midway Road, Dallas in the Fellowship Hall

Speaker: Dallas County Master Gardener, Fran Powell.

Education Credit for Master Gardeners. Bring a friend.

This free event is open to the public.

 

Fran Powell comes from a family of English gardeners. Her mother instilled in her four daughters a love of the mysteries of life in the garden; from planting seeds and watching their growth to enjoying and harvesting the results.

Fran came to the USA in 1969 and to Texas in 1982. After spending seven years in Waco, she moved to the Dallas area in 1989. Two of Fran’s sisters are true English gardeners. Her younger sister has an award-winning vineyard in the southern part of England, while the eldest has a garden open to the public every year, including a meadow, which she leaves wild, many fruit trees and an enviable vegetable garden. Fran has used many of her eldest sister’s frugal methods and plans to share them with us.

What a treat—plan to come and learn from an experienced gardener and enjoy our gardens after class.

The courtyard of The Raincatcher’s Garden

Lisa Centala

Ann Lamb

Picture by Starla Willis

 

Plan Now to Attend the May Master Gardener Meeting and Plant Sale

Dallas County Master Gardener Association

May Meeting

 10:00am Plant Sale · 11:30am Meeting · Thursday, May 25th

Location: Midway Hills Christian Church Fellowship Hall, 11001 Midway Rd.

(West side of Midway just north of Royal Lane) Dallas 75229

Please use the south and west parking lots at Midway Hills Christian Church. The north lot is used by Dallas Cooperative Preschool parents.

 Plant and Brick Sale

Find summer-hardy plants to continue the gardening season with selections from our annual plant sale.

Honor a loved one with a brick purchase.

Cash, checks or credit cards accepted.

 

Program: “Fifty Shades of Green” showcasing 50 common

and rare native plants to use in the home landscape

 

Speaker: Ricky Linex who is a wildlife biologist for the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). He is also the author of

“Range Plants of North Central Texas, A Land User’s Guide to Their Identification, Value and Management” – a plant identification book for Texas detailing 324 various regional grasses, forbs, and woody plants.  

Book Sale 

The gift shop at Texas Discovery Gardens is the sole retail outlet in Dallas County for sales of this interesting book.  In conjunction with Mr. Linex’s presentation to DCMGA, a representative from the TDG gift shop will be present at our meeting and will sell copies of “Range Plants”.  The retail price of the book is $25.00.  All profits from the gift shop support TDG’s educational programs and mission.

Please join us for the plant sale and the monthly meeting,

which are both open to the public.

 

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