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News From the Winter Vegetable Patch at Raincatcher’s

Lovely looking lettuce but guess what Syann told me-it took 3 sowings to get that lovely lettuce because the rain kept washing the seeds away.

Lettuce crop at Raincatcher’s 2019

Here’s our recent radish harvest. We have planted more radish seeds to enjoy throughout the spring.

Freshly pulled radishes

A dedicated team of Master Gardeners cultivates our vegetable gardens. As you can see in the picture below, note only one smiling gardener, it takes persistence and concentration to tend a research, education and demonstration garden.

Dallas County Master Gardeners-Sue, Cindy, Dorothy, Jim and Syann

We farm this patch of earth on Midway Road so that we can help you. Come see us on Tuesday mornings, attend our classes, or send us a question on this blog. We’d love to help your garden grow.

Ann Lamb

Pictures by Starla Willis


This year we will plant potatoes in the color wheel in the green section because, well, they have pretty green leaves.  Review our video: Perfectly Planted Potatoes Premieres

It’s time to plant onions, buy them now at your favorite garden center and plant like this.

A list of our 2019 classes will be coming later this month.

Raincatcher’s Garden Fund Raiser, Tuesday, January 8th at Fish City Grill

Fish City Grill-deliciousness with a purpose!

Celebrate the new year with friends and family at Fish City Grill on Tuesday, January 8th  and help the Raincatcher’s Garden.  The local gathering spot is known for Oyster Nachos, fresh seafood and a fun, casual atmosphere.

Mater Gardener, Sarah Sanders, and husband, Gerald, and friend enjoying the food and atmosphere at Fish City Grill.

 
Fish City Grill supports local organizations through its First Tuesday Benefit.  Raincatcher’s will receive 15% of the day’s receipts, including take-out!
 
Fish City Grill is located on the southeast corner of Preston and Royal, near Central Market. Enjoy your Smokin’ Hot Shrimp and Fish Tacos from 11 am to 10 pm.
 
 
 
Address: 10720 Preaston Road #1012
Dallas, Texas 75230
Phone: 214-891-9979
 
Contact Sue Weiner with any questions:  srw427@aol.com

 

 

Happy New Year 2019 and It’s Getting Cold Outside!

Raincatcher’s Volunteers at our Christmas Party. Some Volunteers are missing from this picture and more needed! Happy Gardening in 2019 from our garden to yours.

Q. You have often mentioned cold tolerant vegetable crops and those which are very susceptible to frosty injury.  Could you list these and temperature lows which they can tolerate?

A. This is very difficult to do and be accurate since cold tolerance depends on preconditioning. For instance, if broccoli has been growing in warm conditions and temperatures drop below 22 degrees F., it will probably be killed. If these same broccoli plants had experienced cool weather, they would probably survive the sudden cold.

In general, a frost (31-33 degrees F.) will kill beans, cantaloupe, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, okra, peas, pepper, potatoes, sweet potatoes, squash, tomatoes, and watermelon.

Colder temperatures (26-31 degrees F.) may burn foliage but will not kill broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, chard, lettuce, mustard, onion, radish, and turnip.

The real cold weather champs are beets, Brussels sprouts, carrots, collards, kale, parsley, and spinach.

Thank you Aggie Archives for this information!

More about frost protection here.

Cold Tolerant Veggies from Daniel Cunningham here.

Ann Lamb

 

 

Shopping For Seeds for Next Year’s Garden

Dorothy shopping for Raincatcher’s via catalog!

Jim, Could I ask some questions about starting seeds for our 2019 gardens.

While many of us buy transplants for our garden, it’s a step up to know that our garden plans to start everything from seed.  What’s your reasoning behind that decision?
  By starting our seeds indoors, we can purchase the seed selection that we want and hopefully they will be ready to transplant at the proper time.  Some seeds are difficult to start from seed and it is better to just purchase the transplants, for example onions and leeks.  Also, some seeds are easy to start by planting directly into the ground – radishes, greens, beans, okra for example.
Are you planning to start everything for our vegetable garden from seed?
 For the raised vegetable beds, we plan on starting the peppers, tomatoes indoors and for the first time eggplant and tomatillo.
Why not the pepper, Hot Big Boss Man, that you grew last year?
 We like to try new varieties and interesting vegetables each year.  This year the peppers will be from the All America Selection list.
Ok, that was my next question. Did I hear that all seeds would be All-American varieties and why is that important? 
All of our peppers will be All American Selections (AAS) winners, except for the Poblano L.  AAS winners have been “Tested and Proven Locally” for garden superiority by horticultural professionals across North America.

Last year’s tomatoes(2018) started by seed, thanks to Jim!

You are an expert on tomato grafting! Which tomato varieties do you plan to graft and on what stock? 
No, I am not an expert by any means. I attended a workshop at a MG state conference and have grafted tomatoes with some success several times.  I also, presented an informal presentation at Joe Field garden years ago.  We plan on using the rootstock Estamino VFFNTA hybrid and grafting heirloom tomatoes, Brandywine Red and Cherokee Purple onto the rootstock.  Hoping for the same excellent flavor of the heirloom with improved production.
When do you plan to start these seeds indoors for the spring season?  Peppers we start mid-January and tomatoes mid-February. Probably, the other seeds around mid-February.  That will give us about 6 weeks before we set them out into the garden. The seedlings will be in the greenhouse the last two weeks before transplanting.
Thank you, Jim, this will help all of us as we plan our gardens for 2019.
Here’s a partial list of the seeds we are starting at the Raincatcher’s Garden:
Tomatoes-Lemon Boy and Celebrity
Peppers-Carmen, Carnato, Gallo, Gypsy, Poblano L and Hot Sweet Hybrid
Ann Lamb
Picture in greenhouse by Starla Willis

More About Fall Color in Dallas 2018

The trees in North Texas are brighter and more colorful than ever — or at least that’s what some Dallas residents have determined.

Dallasites on Facebook have taken notice of the colorful fall foliage, with one poster saying, “All of that rain must’ve helped because I’ve never seen such pretty autumn leaves in Texas as I have this year.”

Another commenter said, “This year has been the prettiest of the 13 years we’ve been here.”

While that’s all conjecture, Daniel Cunningham, horticulturist with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and self-proclaimed “Texas Plant Guy,” said Texans taking notice of brighter colors might be onto something.

Cunningham explained that cool weather helps to break down the chlorophyll — that’s the green pigment in plants — allowing the yellow and orange pigments to shine through. When temperatures reach just above freezing, it increases anthocyanin formation, and that pigment produces the red and purple leaves.

The rain storms that plagued North Texas recently may have also helped the trees keep their leaves longer, giving them more time to change colors for all to see.

A commenter in a Facebook thread of Frisco residents comparing North Texas’ fall leaves with the colors of Northeastern fall leaves said, “As a lover of all things fall and someone who finally did a fall foliage trip a couple of years ago, it really is stunning this year.”

Cunningham said that autumn is the best time to plant trees in Texas as well as the perfect excuse to head over to a local tree nursery.

Another Facebook user said, “It’s gorgeous if you take side streets to your destination wherever that may be just to see the foliage.”

Cunningham agreed.

“Folks, get outside and enjoy it,” he said. “Whether you do that by walking in your neighborhood or hiking around DFW, do it because we probably only have two more weeks of this lovely fall color to enjoy.”

Thank you to the Dallas Observer and Nashwa Bawab  for allowing us to print this story.

Ann Lamb

Click here for tree  suggestions to plant now that will be rock stars next spring, article by Daniel Cunningham

Japanese Maple picture by Starla

 

Fall Color in Dallas 2018

 

Sweetgum tree with brilliant fall color at Raincatcher’s Garden

Eric,

This Fall has been spectacular with so many kinds of trees with brilliant fall colors. Some had said it has to do with our long hot summer while others have said the rain came at just the right time and it’s a combination of the two weather factors.

What do you think is causing such beautiful fall color in 2018?

What trees would you recommend for fall color? Say someone wants to buy a tree this fall in hopes for future fall color in their yard.

What about Shantung Maples, I see alot of those in my neighborhood and I like the shape of them. Ann

Hi Ann – So good to hear from you. I agree with you 100 % on the beautiful fall colors for many of our trees in the Urban Forest. There are many different opinions on the reasons for the beautiful colors this Fall. The truth is that tree people know that temperature(highs and lows), water, first freeze date, all play a part in the Fall colors but cannot figure out the exact timing of these variables to come up with a nice tidy equation that will let us all know when to expect the beautiful  colors.

My neighbor from New York planted a Bradford Pear a few years ago . She loved the Fall colors but also found out the final ending for Bradford Pears is not pretty. I suggested she might want to look at the Shantung Maple. She planted one four years ago and every year would ask me when the beautiful oranges and reds would show up. I told her to be patient, the yellow colors looked great but it wasn’t until this Fall that she finally got the brilliant oranges that she has been waiting on. I am thinking of trying one of the Shantung maples at RCG. I have given up on the Ginkgo. They require too much tender loving care for the first two years and we need to recommend trees that are hardy and can survive with a minimum amount of care to the public. I would also like to be able to fine a Big Tooth Maple but availability in the nurseries is very limited.

I think you are on the right trail with the Shantung.

Have a great Holiday season,

Eric

Thank you,Eric, and thank you for all the effort and thought you put into our demonstration forest at Raincatcher’s!

Ann Lamb

Picture by Starla Willis

Eric Larner is a Dallas County Master Gardener from the class of 2006 and a Citizen Forester. He and his wife, Jane(also a Master Gardener) work at The Raincatcher’s Garden and many other places in Dallas planting and speaking about trees.

 

Butterflies at Raincatcher’s Garden, Fall 2018

Where have all the butterflies gone? We enjoyed so many this fall in our garden.

Monarch butterfly sipping nectar from Tithonia, Mexican Sunflower.

Cloudless Sulphur butterfly on a canna in our color wheel.

Queen butterfly alight Lantana, Miss Huff.

American Snout on an Okra blossom.

By late November, most butterflies have bred and died. Their  offspring  overwinter in egg, larva, or chrysalis form until next spring.

 Some adult butterflies have gone farther south and some overwinter in Dallas as adults.  Monarch migration is perhaps the most well knows but also  the Painted Lady, Common Buckeye, American Lady, Red Admiral, Cloudless Sulphur, Skipper, Sachem, Question Mark, Clouded Skipper, Fiery Skipper and Mourning Cloak  migrate to warmer regions.
Ann Lamb
Pictures by Starla Willis. Thank you, Starla!

Fascinating news from the Native Plant Society-click to read their newsletter.

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