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Category Archives: Vegetable Gardening in Dallas

Fall Veggie Gardening Resources

 

Last year our family chomped through lettuce, spinach, Swiss chard and broccoli out of this little garden fall through spring.

Dallas Garden Buzz asked Daniel Cunningham, Horticulturist and Program Coordinator at Texas A&M AgriLife about fall gardening a couple of weeks ago. He has given us good information and was right on with his *rain prediction:

Fall is a great time for growing vegetables in Texas! Coming off the driest growing season (to date) in 109 years in DFW, even the most seasoned green thumb’s gardens may have struggled in 2018.

Plants and planters can be renewed this fall. Let’s rejoice in the fact that there are cooler temperatures ahead and hopefully some *well-timed rain events. AgriLife has an incredible network of resources to help folks root into fall vegetable gardening!

o    Sustainable Vegetable Gardening brochure

o    TAMU Fall Planting Guide

o    TAMU Vegetable Variety Selector

o    TAMU Vegetable Resources

o    TAMU Vegetable Integrated Pest Managment

o    TAMU Plant Clinic

 

Dallas Garden Buzz thanks Daniel Cunningham:       

Horticulturist | Program Coordinator     (972) 952-9223

@TXPlantGuy

 

 

The Truth About Our Tomato Trials

We are disappointed, not giving up but yes, disappointed.

As you may remember, the Raincatcher’s Garden started off in early April with 6 tomato plants in our raised beds and high hopes.

We had vigourous plants with beautiful stems full of promise. Jeff complimented us on our healthy looking plants.  We lost one tomato plant but with 5 plants we harvested:

24 lbs of tomatoes on June 19th

19 lbs of tomatoes on June 24th

Tomato Trial Weigh In

but then it happened-our tomatoes were stolen.

Our tomato plants were loaded with healthy looking green tomatoes until someone wiped us clean, taking all our tomatoes and every single peach on our peach tree.

Promising Tomato Crop
Before!

We are not giving up but hoping  this wrongdoing  will give way to an understanding of our purpose at The Raincatcher’s Garden.

As a research, education, and demonstration garden, we grow so that we can teach others. Read back about our tomato trials to see how much work was involved and understand our goal. We believe most home gardeners wants to have a higher crop yield while conserving water and without pesticides. That’s what we want to teach through our research and demonstration.

What we did learn from our limited trial was that the results were not affected by the three different kinds of soil prep.

At the end of August, we are revamping the soil in our raised beds by adding a purchased compost mix. After that we will begin our fall planting.

Beds 1, 2-all kinds of lettuce: Romaine, Red Sails, Mesculin, Green Ice

Bed 3-bush beans

Bed 4- spinach

Bed 5-beets and turnips

Bed 6-radishes

Bed 7-broccoli and Brussel sprouts

Bed 8-kale and swiss chard

Bed 9-TBD

And yes, we will plant tomatoes again in the spring.

Ann Lamb as told  by Sue Weiner and Dorothy Shockley

Review our tomato trial protocol here.

 

August Garden Survey III

Kay Mcinnis and Wendy Leanse are the coordinators at the Temple Emanu-El Community Garden. This is Part III of our August Garden Survey. Great information from a fruitful Dallas County Master Gardener project on the grounds of Temple Emanu-El.

In August you should be planning for the fall. Take a look at the planting guide put out by TAMU. Its mostly too hot to plant seeds directly into the beds so it’s ideal to start plants indoors.

We are harvesting Long Beans, Cucumbers (particularly Armenian cucumbers which don’t seem to be bothered by aphids), okra, peppers, eggplant, collard greens and tons of black eyed peas and our Cucuzzi  squash has just started producing.

A Look Down Long Bean Alee; See Long Beans Dangling from the Vines

 

We have bitter melons planted that have also just started to bear. Ruth Klein introduced us to several tropical vegetables that don’t seem to be bothered by Texas pests that  have done well.

Bitter Melon at Temple Eman-uel Garden

We have 3 tomatoes planted to see if we can get a fall crop – maybe or maybe not…

We are at the end of our chard and will be preparing the beds to receive some Mustard Greens, Chinese Cabbage and various root vegetables that will produce through the winter.

As our current crops wind down, we will see if we can amend the soil and get a quick crop in or if we should re-new the beds with a cover crop. I have already ordered seeds for that since I found that last year things got sold out.

Last year we put in drip irrigation and are currently watering our beds 3 times a week for 60 min each. We will cut back if it ever rains again in Texas, or when it cools down. We also have volunteers that check our garden during the week to see if everything seems to be getting watered. We found that as the irrigation lines weather, they tend to pop off and need to be re-attached using hose clamps.

A Reminder of the Effort Involved to Lay Drip Irrigation, but it’s Worthwhile!

Our gardeners meet every week on Sunday at 8:30am where we clean up, weed, water what is necessary and harvest/prepare vegetables to take to the Vickery Meadows Food Pantry!

Kay McInnis, Master Gardener class of 2016

More information about long beans here.

August Garden Survey II

 It’s August and  I wanted to write a little something for the blog that would encourage our readers and remind them fall is coming.   Here’s Patti Brewer’s reply when everything seemed so bleak and no rain was in sight:

Well, I’m flattered you asked.  This spring we had the shortest growing season I’ve ever experienced in all these years.

 We had one big flourish of zucchini and yellow squash and then  production was halted because of the intense early heat  and lack of rain out west of Ft Worth where I veggie garden. This area is not the same growing zone as Dallas!
 Squash plants were babied when the spring would not come and covered  up when a freeze came through in late April; then the heat came with a vengeance. Plus I am ruthless for “squashing” the squash bugs and their eggs that always appear. I am blaming the limited squash harvest on the on the heat and lack of rain.
Patti, we agree it’s not  your fault! 

Brewer Vegetable Garden Earlier This Year

The only thing we are harvesting  now is jalapeños and Serrano peppers. Bell peppers are struggling. We usually get our most productive harvest of peppers in Oct and Nov.

It was 111 degrees one weekend in July!   We are sandy loamy soil. So you can imagine how things are barely hanging on in the veggie garden.

Blooms on a Regenerated Spring Tomato in 100 degrees-August 2018

I am trying to regenerate about half of our spring tomato plants. I will sprinkle our homemade compost on the tomatoes and peppers this weekend because it is getting down in to the low 70’s

We are not on a drip irrigation system in the garden. I have mulched and mulched again which has helped. We were a failure at beets. Not sure why. I do have a loofa growing on supports that the English peas were growing on in the early spring, But It hasn’t bloomed yet.

 

 

 

For the fall we always plant the following: mustard and turnip greens, garlic, spinach, turnips and kale. Sometimes we don’t plant the spinach or kale till November.

I will be planting a new area for wildflowers in September. I have harvested many wildflower seeds from this past spring! Just hope we get the rain for those to germinate. Our farm locate west of Weatherford is experiencing big time drought.

Orb Spider Spins a Victim!

 

 

My  recent video of a hummingbird hawk moth and a picture of an Orb spider mummifying a grasshopper have been our entertainment. All from out here in Palo Pinto county!!

 

Patti, did you get any rain in the last week?

Yes!!! As of August 19th, we have received almost 3 inches!!  I’m seeing my bluebonnets sprouting!! I have a new seeded wildflower plot that is 20 X 25 feet. That makes me happy. Loofah is vining like crazy. Still waiting on it to bloom. Tomatoes and peppers have so many promising blooms!!  I have a few tomatoes on the vine too!!

Temperatures although mostly still in upper 90s with lows in the low 70s are making my garden happy. Black eyed peas are up along with mustard and turnip greens. Kale is up because I shook the dried seeds from my kale plants from last winter! Previously planted in the summer was zipper cream peas and black eyes. They look great now and I picked some even. I planted Blue Lake Bush green beans yesterday.

Rain was very important for our entire place. Fall is my most favorite season!!

Patti Brewer, Master Gardener class of 2012

 

August Garden Survey

Dallas Garden Buzz asked several other gardeners to give a report about their August gardens. In the next two weeks, we will be posting their stories with information about what worked and what didn’t. Garden plots produce success and failure. Keep trying and learn from these honest accounts!

Sheila Kostelny, a Master Gardener from the class of  gardens at her home in North Dallas.

Sheila, what’s growing in your garden in August.

Sheila’s Sweet Potato Vines

 

My sweet potato crop was planted with Beauregard starts from last year’s harvest.  My harvest last year yielded a fantastic harvest and I’m hopeful for another.

The bush lima bean has done well this year and the produce is so delicious.  It is still producing.  There was no particular variety for the lima bean.

 

 

 

I planted Kentucky Wonder green pole bean and Henderson bush green bean. They were a total disappointment this year.  I harvested a total of ONE pole bean and maybe 2 handfuls of bush beans.

What was a favorite spring success?

The potatoes were harvested late spring.  These were Red Norland and Yukon Gold.  I had good luck fooling the borers this year.

Sheila’s Potatoes

 

Fall garden?

I will be planting beets, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, collards, lettuces, mustard, parsley and spinach in the fall.

Sheila Kostelny

Recipes from Fig Fest coming tomorrow.

May Harvest At The Raincatcher’s Garden

A wheelbarrow of leeks, onions, garlic. Bush beans are growing in raised bed behind the harvest and our mulch piles are in the upper right corner.

Blackberry Pickings; these will make delicious jelly or cobblers.

This is a view of our raised beds brimming with healthy veggie plants and bordered by grapevines. You can see Dorothy and Syann measuring tomatoes in Bed #1.

Ann Lamb

Why would you measure tomatoes plants and weigh harvest? 

Growing blackberries in Dallas

 

 

2018 Summer Garden Plans

Raincatcher’s Garden Plots Spring 2018

Several weeks ago I was the fly on the wall listening to the greats of our garden map out future garden beds.

As you know from our last post, our 3  trial beds will have Celebrity tomatoes. One bed will be fertilized with chemical fertilizer, one with organic and one will receive compost.  Tomatoes will be weighed and plants measured to determine which method of fertilization is best.

Jim has started Black Krim and Purple Cherokee Tomatoes by seed.

We will also grow San Marzano tomatoes at Linda’s suggestion. These are the only tomatoes we will grow without a cage. Linda had great success letting her San Marzano sprawl across her garden bed rather than being contained in a cage. Linda says the thick cover of the plant kept the squirrels away. Really, Linda? I am going to give that a try.

Pepper plants will be in #3.  Poblano, Serranos, Hot Boss Big Man and Sweet Gypsy are on our list. Sue savored the Sweet Gypsy peppers.  And yes, Hot Big Boss Man is the name of a hybrid pepper, a cross between an ancho and  poblano.  More info here.

Cucumbers and Eggplant to be planted later in bed #5 and notice long beans will also have a home there.

Contender and Goldmine beans will be planted April 1st.

Okra will be planted  in 6 when the onions and garlic are pulled.

Blackeyed peas will grow on a trellis all summer says Dorothy.

We are out of room! What about pumpkins you say? Jim suggested planting them around the fig tree in the field.

If you need a vegetable planting guide, here are two we have relied on:

North Texas Planting Guide by TAMU

NHG Planting Guide

Be sure to tap our new Master Gardener website for a wealth of information.

Ann Lamb

Plot Plan by Dorothy Shockley

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