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Grow and Graze Recipes Part II and August 27th Annoucement

July 13, 2019

Gardening friends, I forgot to include the tomato sauce that goes with the Raincatcher’s Summer Garden Ratatouille served at the Herbs of the Mediterranean Grow and Graze event. So here it is along with the potato salad full of herbs.

Read to the end of the post to see the information about our next Grow and Gaze event. Sign up begins July 24th.

Endless Summer Tomato Sauce

Ingredients

½ cup plus 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided

1 onion, peeled and finely diced

4 cloves garlic, mashed

1 teaspoon chili flakes

1 tablespoon fennel seeds

½ pound grass-fed beef, optional

Salt and freshly ground pepper

1 cup red wine

5 large ripe tomatoes, peeled and lightly pureed in a food processor

2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh oregano

2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley

Pinch of sugar or dash of local honey

8 fresh basil leaves, torn

Directions

In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, heat 2 tablespoons oil over medium-high heat.  When bubbling, add the onion and garlic; stir, reduce heat, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add chili flakes and fennel and cook for about 1 minute. Increase the heat to medium-high and add the beef.  Cook until browned, stirring occasionally, seasoning along the way with salt and pepper. NOTE:  Omit the last two steps if you are making a meatless sauce and continue from here

Deglaze pan with the red wine, picking up any brown bits by stirring with a flat-edged wooden spoon.  Cook over medium-high heat until the wine has reduced by half.

Add the remaining ingredients except the basil and stir.  Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer.  Cook slowly for 1 to 2 hours.  Taste to verify seasonings and adjust accordingly.  Add the fresh basil after the sauce is removed from the heat.  Cool and freeze for up to four months.

Yield: 4 to 5 cups

Salad of New Potatoes with Sweet Cicely, Lovage and Green Peppercorns

Ingredients

2 ½ pounds new potatoes

1 ½ teaspoon salt

½ cup plain yogurt

½ cup low-fat sour cream

2 tablespoons mayonnaise

¼ cup chopped red onion

2 tablespoons chopped fresh sweet cicely

2 tablespoons chopped fresh lovage, plus 1 sprig for garnish

2 tablespoons green peppercorns

Directions

In a saucepan, combine the potatoes with water to cover by 2 inches. Add 1 teaspoon of the salt, bring to a boil over medium-high heat, and then reduce the heat to medium and cook, covered, until the potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork, about 25 minutes.

Drain the potatoes. As soon as you can handle them, peel and cut crosswise into ½-inch-thick slices.

Place the potato slices in a large salad bow and add the yogurt, sour cream and mayonnaise. Turn well to mix. Add the remaining ½ teaspoon salt, the onion, sweet cicely, chopped lovage, and green peppercorns and turn again to mix. Cover and let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 6 hours and up to 24 hours to allow the flavors to blend fully before serving. Garnish with a sprig of lovage and serve.

Yield: Serves 4


Corn, the Golden Essence of Summer and Okra, A Garden Giant-GROW AND GRAZE AUGUST 27TH

Corn’s versatility is endless, lending a festive look to almost any dish. Discover the delectable potential of this simple vegetable. Savor its natural sweetness in a menu packed with everything from delicious openers to breads, chowders and desserts.

Okra is best described by award-winning chef, Michael W. Twitty, as “a globetrotter that dances so well with tomatoes, onions and corn that nobody remembers a time when the four did not carouse the kitchens of the Afro Atlantic world in search of lusty steam and the heat of a hot chili pepper looking to dance, too.” 

Tuesday, August 27th

A “Grow and Graze” Event Hosted by Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills

10:00 – 11:00am * 11001 Midway Road * Church Sanctuary

Panel Discussion Led by Raincatcher’s Dallas County Master Gardener Vegetable Experts

(Master Gardeners earn up to two CEUs)

Immediately following the program please join us in the Community Hall for a Picnic-style Lunch

11:15 – 12:30

$15 per person, Reserved seating for 60, Tickets on sale July 24th, 10am, Deadline August 20th

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/corn-the-golden-essence-of-summer-and-okra-a-garden-giant-tickets-65175370287

Menu

Santa Fe Corn Soup Garnished with Fresh Oregano, Blue Corn Tortilla Chips

Fried Okra Pods with Pickle Aioli

Fresh Corn Cakes with Heirloom Tomato Relish and Tarragon Crème Fraiche

Warm Okra and Red Onion Salad with Pine Nuts

Esquites: Mexican Street Corn Salad Cups

Breadbasket Sampler: Cheddar Dill Cornbread, Corn & Jalapeno Muffins, Fresh Okra Muffins

Sweet Corn and Hazelnut Crunch Chocolate Cake with Chocolate Ganache

Sweet Corn Ice Cream with Blackberry Verbena Sauce

Linda Alexander

Pictures by Starla Willis

Herbs of the Mediterranean Recipes

 

Iced Herb Gazpacho

This recipe first appeared in the Dallas County Master Gardener Association cookbook, ‘A Year on the Plate’ and on our blog in 2016. It remains our very favorite for recipe for gazpacho. The addition of 5 fresh herbs gathered from the garden give it an exciting boost of flavor.

 

 

 

Ingredients

6 large tomatoes, quartered (peel, if desired)

4 cloves fresh garlic, pressed

¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

¼ cup red wine vinegar

¼ cup olive oil

½ cucumber, peeled and chopped

2 scallions, chopped

1 sorrel leaf, deveined and coarsely chopped

2 sprigs fresh basil

3 sprigs salad burnet

3 sprigs cilantro

3 sprigs parsley

Salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

Cucumber slices and fresh thyme sprigs for garnish

Directions

Roughly puree tomatoes, garlic, cucumber, red pepper flakes, vinegar and oil in the workbowl of a food processor.  Leave some texture to the ingredients.

Add the herbs and pulse just until chopped.  Do not “blend” or mixture will become too brown.

Refrigerate overnight to allow flavors to blend.  Serve slightly chilled or at room temperature.  Garnish with a cucumber slice and a fresh thyme sprig.

Every Herb Pesto

When selecting recipes for our cookbook, the testing committee concluded that this was the most delicious pesto they had ever tasted. A perfect combination of seven garden-fresh herbs elevates the flavor profile to superior status. (Chervil is the ‘tricky’ herb. Early to late fall, and then again in spring, is when you typically find it growing in our garden).

Ingredients:

½ cup Marcona almonds, toasted

2 cloves garlic, peeled

1 cup fresh spinach leaves

½ cup grated Parmesan cheese

½ cup fresh cilantro leaves

½ cup fresh parsley leaves

¼ cup basil leaves

¼ cup fresh tarragon leaves

⅛ cup fresh mint leaves

1 tablespoon fresh chervil leaves

2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

Zest of lemon

Juice of 1 lemon

¾ cup canola oil

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper

Garlic-rubbed crostini, optional

Heirloom tomatoes, chopped, optional

Directions:

  1. Blend the almonds and garlic in a food processor until fine. Add the spinach, cheese, herbs, lemon zest and lemon juice to the food processor.  Blend the herbs just enough so they are mixed, about 3 seconds.
  2. Add the canola oil and olive oil while the food processor is on a low setting. Season with salt and pepper. Blend to desired consistency.
  3. Transfer the pesto to a serving bowl. Place the chopped tomatoes on top of the crostini if using and top with pesto.

Yield: 2 cups

Note:  Any leftover pesto should be placed in a bowl and covered with plastic wrap.  Press the plastic wrap right on top of the pesto and refrigerate.

Above: Swiss Chard and Black Olive Tart

Black Olive and Swiss Chard Tart

In her beloved cookbook, ‘Pedaling Through Provence’, Sarah Leah Chase takes you on a technicolor journey through the sun-blessed cuisine of the Mediterranean. She calls this savory version of the tart, “love at first and last bite”.

 

Pastry Ingredients

1 ¼ cups unbleached all-purpose flour

1 ½ tablespoons minced fresh rosemary

Pinch of sea or coarse salt

8 tablespoons (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

2 teaspoons imported Dijon mustard

2 to 3 tablespoons ice water

Filling Ingredients

1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), washed, stems and thick center ribs removed, leaves patted dry

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 large onion, minced

3 cloves garlic, minced

½ teaspoon dried thyme

Pinch of grated nutmeg

½ cup freshly grated Gruyere cheese

2 large eggs

½ cup light cream or half-and-half

Sea or coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

2 cups pitted Nyons or Kalamata olives

2 tablespoons pine nuts

Directions

Make the pastry: Place the flour, rosemary, salt, and butter in a food processor and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the mustard and enough ice water so that the dough begins to form a ball as the machine is pulsed on and off. Gather the dough into a flat disk, wrap it in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the filling. Cut the Swiss chard leaves into ½-inch-wide strips. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté until soft and translucent, 7 to 10 minutes.  Add the chard, garlic, thyme, and nutmeg. Cook until the chard leaves have wilted and any water given off has evaporated, 5 to7 minutes. Remove from the heat and gently mix in the cheese.

Beat the eggs and cream together in a mixing bowl and then fold in the chard mixture, blending well. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 400˚F.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the chilled pastry dough to form a 12- to 13-inch circle. Transfer to an 11-inch tart pan and trim and crimp the edges decoratively. Spread the chard filling evenly in the tart shell. Arrange the olives in concentric circles over the top, pressing lightly into the filling. Sprinkle the pine nuts in between the olives.

Bake the tart until the crust is golden and the filling is set, 30 to 40 minutes. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.

Yield: Serves 6 to 8 as a luncheon or 12 to 14 as an appetizer.

Green Herbs and Butterhead Lettuce Salad

This recipe and the  from award-winning cookbook author, Georgeanne Brennan, inspired us to get busy growing, harvesting and using herbs daily. While one delicate herb, sweet cicely, succumbed to our summer heat, plans are to include it in our fall garden. Stay posted for updates.

Ingredients

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon chopped shallot

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice or red wine vinegar

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 head butterhead lettuce, leaves separated

1 cup fresh chervil sprigs

½ cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

¼ cup small, tender fresh sorrel leaves

Directions

In the bottom of a salad bowl, combine the olive oil and shallot and stir together. Whisk in the lemon juice or vinegar. Taste for balance. Add the salt and pepper and taste again, adjusting as desired.

Tear the lettuce leaves into bite-sized pieces, and put them into the bowl along with the chervil, parsley and sorrel. When ready to serve, toss well.

Yield: Serves 3 or 4

Herb-Seasoned Croutons

Ingredients

8 slices day-old coarse country bread, each about 1 inch thick

¼ cup extra-virgin oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

½ teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme

1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon minced fresh oregano or sweet marjoram

Directions

Without removing the crusts, cut the bread slices into 1-inch cubes. In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté until translucent, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the bread cubes, reduce the heat to low and cook slowly, turning once, until golden and crusty, 4 to 5 minutes on each side.

Sprinkle the cubes with the salt, thyme, rosemary and oregano or marjoram. Turn a few times in the pan to coat evenly. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the croutons to paper towels to drain and cool. To store, put in a paper bag, fold the top over several times and keep for up to 1 week.

Yield: Makes About 32 Croutons, About 4 Cups

 

Raincatcher’s Garden Summer Ratatouille

There are countless recipes for Ratatouille. However, this simple and colorful version ‘wowed’ guests at our ‘Herbs of the Mediterranean’ Grow and Graze event. Don’t let summer pass without making this one!

Ingredients

3-4 baby eggplants

3-4 medium tomatoes

1 yellow zucchini squash

1 green zucchini squash

1 yellow straight-neck squash

2-3 shallots

Olive oil, to taste

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Endless Summer Tomato Sauce

Several sprigs of fresh oregano

Directions

Pour 1 cup of tomato sauce into the bottom of an 8- to 9-inch baking dish.

Using a mandolin, slice first six ingredients thinly and evenly approximately ¼” thick. Make mini stacks using one of each sliced vegetable. Arrange a few stacks at a time into the prepared baking dish forming concentric spirals from the outer edge to the center. Fan out slightly allowing top part of vegetables to be seen. Use any leftover slices to fill the center.

Drizzle with a small amount of olive oil and season with fresh pepper. Bake at 350˚F until vegetables are just soft to the touch but not overcooked. Check at 20 minutes.

Options: Fill center with goat cheese just as dish comes out of the oven. Spoon sauce over the top and serve with a crusty slice of bread.

Olive Oil Cake

You seldom here about this intensely moist and flavorful cake served during the dessert course. We hope to change you mind.  Restaurant owners, Jennifer and David Uygur  shared their recipe in the Dallas Morning News. Each slice was topped with a generous dollop of lavender-infused whipped cream and a sprinkling of fresh, locally grown blueberries.

Ingredients

2 cups flour

½ teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon baking powder

¼ teaspoon sea salt

3 large eggs

1 ½ cups sugar

1 cup fruity olive oil

1 ½ cups whole milk

3 tablespoons microplaned mixed citrus zest (lemon, orange, grapefruit)

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme leaves

Directions

Heat oven to 360˚F (this is correct) if using a 10- to 12-cup Bundt pan.

Heat oven to 350˚F if using a 10-inch cake pan with removable bottom.

Sift flour, baking soda, baking powered and salt together into a medium bowl. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the eggs with the sugar, then add the oil and mix until homogeneous.

Add the milk, zest and thyme. Gently mix in the flour and pour into a greased and floured 10- to 12-cup Bundt pan. (If using a 10-inch cake pan with removable bottom, grease, line with a parchment circle, then grease again and flour).

Bake for about 45 to 50 minutes, until a tester comes out clean (baking times vary depending on oven and pans, so keep an early eye on it). Place on a rack to cool. After 10 minutes turn cake out of the pan onto rack and let cool completely. Slice and serve on a plate. Garnish with your choice of toppings; whipped cream, whipped crème fraiche, fresh berries, sliced peaches or apricots.

Yield: Makes 12 servings.

Linda Alexander

 

 

 

Herbs of the Mediterranean, A Grow and Graze Event

Herbs of the Mediterranean

Herbs activate our senses. Join us for a culinary trip to the Mediterranean where we’ll explore some of the world’s best tasting food. Be inspired by this delightfully aromatic way of using fresh and dried herbs in your cooking.

Tuesday, June 25th

A “Grow and Graze” Event Hosted by

 The Raincatcher’s Garden of Midway Hills

Time:  10:00 – 11:00

Location:  11001 Midway Road Church Sanctuary

Instructor: Marian Buchanan, Dallas County Master Gardener, Herb Specialist

(Master Gardeners earn two CEU’s)

Immediately following the program, please join us at our Mediterranean Table

Lunch: 11:15 – 12:30

$15 per person, Reserved seating for 60 available starting May 20th. Deadline June 18th

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/herbs-of-the-mediterranean-tickets-60462949309

Menu

Iced Herb Gazpacho and Toasted Baguette Slices spread with Every Herb Pesto

Black Olive & Swiss Chard Tart

Green Herbs & Butterhead Lettuce Salad with Herb-Seasoned Croutons

Salad of New Potatoes with Sweet Cicely, Lovage and Green Peppercorns

Mediterranean Summer Roasted Vegetable Ratatouille

Honey-Lemon Olive Oil Cake with Whipped Crème Fraiche and Fresh Berries

Lavender Honey Ice Cream

All members of the public invited for the free lecture. To make a reservation for the lunch use the eventbrite link above.

Linda Alexander

Edible Landscape Spring and Summer Planting 2019

May 4, 2019

Ana and Linda enthusiastically took center stage last week to proclaim the spring and summer plans for the Raincatcher’s Edible Landscape. The purpose of our edible landscape is to create a stylish and appealing outdoor space using vegetable, fruit, and herb plant materials. On top of that, think partial shade and an area formerly used as a children’s playground. Add in budget constraints and the lack of an irrigation system..

Without the fervor of Ana and Linda and their band of Master Gardeners, I doubt this garden would have flourished. But with its second birthday round the corner, the edible landscape is ready to take off its training pants and mature into a beautiful and thoughtful garden full of edible delights.

In the next few weeks, look for articles giving more detail about the 2019 design plan. The basil bed has just been planted with many different colors of basil. Hint: research the ombré look and we’ll explain later how it’s being used in the edible landscape.

South Sidewalk Raised Beds – Basil varieties/cultivars: Piccolino (Greek), Napoletano (Genovese), Eloenora (Genovese), Persian (Thai), Cardinal (Thai), Balsamic Blooms (Genovese), Red Freddy (Genovese), Amethyst Black (Genovese)

Ann Lamb

PIctures by Linda Alexander

Open this link for a list of the all the plants  and a plot plan of The Edible Landscape at The Raincatcher’s Garden.

The Edible Landscape Adds a Food Guild

April 30, 2019

The idea of a food guild or food forest is interesting because it is a less labor intensive way to grow food and more sustainable. Everyone likes the idea of low maintenance and more crops, so watch this video to see the food guild we are creating to in our Edible Landscape at The Raincatcher’s Garden.

The food guild utilizes layers of different types of plants. We are fortunate to have towering oak trees for our tall tree layer and also fortunate to have tasted acorn muffins made from acorn flour. So yes, our tall tree layer, the live oak tree is a food source. Next we will have a short tree, a vine will grow up that tree, then a shrub layer, an herb layer, ground cover and a root crop like horseradish or carrots.  As you read this, you should be getting the idea of plants growing together and utilizing each other’s strengths to create this sustainable food guild.

It’s a fascinating concept and you will get to hear of it’s successes and trials, as we watch it over the next few years.

Ana has given us a list of the plants we will be considering for The Raincatcher’s Food Guild. I’m excited about the mandarin orange tree.

Ann Lamb

video by Starla Willis

For more information about planting a food guild click here.

Grow and Graze Salad Garden Recipes II

 

See and taste The Grow and Graze Centerpiece of salad greens and to the left is our table-top appetizer featuring the peppery taste of Wasabi Arugula.

“Kick Up the Heat” Spread

Ingredients

¼ cup Wasabi Arugula, chopped

1-2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 cup sour cream

1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened

1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger, optional

Dash of sea salt

Assorted crackers

Directions

In a medium bowl, whip all ingredients together until smooth. Spread over crackers. Serve immediately or refrigerate for a few days.

Beth cooking dandelion salad for our guests.

Dandelion Salad

Ingredients

6 ounces young dandelion leaves, tough stems and base ends removed*

2 tablespoons blanched hazelnuts (filberts), coarsely chopped (optional)

3 ounces thick-cut sliced slab bacon, cut crosswise into pieces ½ inch wide

1 ½ tablespoons sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

2-3 tablespoons olive oil

Salt and freshly ground coarse pepper to taste

Directions

Pick over the dandelion leaves, tearing the larger ones in half. Place in a wooden salad bowl. Add the hazelnuts, if using.

In a small frying pan over high heat, fry the bacon until crisp and its fat has been rendered, about 1 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to the bowl holding the dandelions, leaving the fat in the pan.

Return the pan to high heat, add the vinegar, and swirl the pan or stir with a wooden spoon to pick up the sediment on the bottom.

Pour in as much additional oil as will be necessary to dress the salad, swirl once to heat a little, and then pour the contents of the pan over the salad. Season with salt and pepper, toss, and serve immediately.

Yield: Serves 6

*If dandelion leaves are not available, the outer dark green leaves of curly endive or spinach may be substituted.

After tasting a smorgasbord of color, flavors, shapes and textures, attendees indulged their sweet tooth with a few garden-inspired desserts:

Blue Ribbon Carrot Cake and Chocolate Beet Cake with Beet Cream Cheese Frosting

Blue Ribbon Carrot Cake

Ingredients

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons soda

½ teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

3 eggs, well beaten

¾ cup vegetable oil

¾ cup buttermilk

2 cups sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 (8-ounce) can crushed pineapple, drained

2 cups grated carrots

1 (3 ½-ounce) can flaked coconut

1 cup chopped walnuts

Buttermilk Glaze

Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting

Directions

Combine flour, soda, salt, and cinnamon; set aside.

Combine eggs, oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla; beat until smooth.  Stir in flour mixture, pineapple, carrots, coconut, and chopped walnuts.  Pour batter into 2 greased and floured 9-inch round cake pans.

Bake at 350˚F for 35 to 40 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean.  Immediately spread Buttermilk Glaze evenly over layers.  Cool in pans 15 minutes; remove from pans, and let cool completely.

Spread Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting between layers and on top and side of cake.  Store cake in refrigerator.

Yield:  One 2-layer cake

Buttermilk Glaze

Ingredients

1 cup sugar

½ teaspoon soda

½ cup buttermilk

½ cup butter

1 tablespoon light corn syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

Combine sugar, soda, buttermilk, butter, and corn syrup in a Dutch oven.  Bring to a boil; cook 4 minutes, stirring often.  Remove from heat, and stir in vanilla.  Yield: about 1 ½ cups.

Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting

Ingredients

½ cup butter, softened

1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 cups sifted powdered sugar

1 teaspoon grated orange rind

1 teaspoon orange juice

Directions

Combine butter and cream cheese, beating until light and fluffy.  Add vanilla, powdered sugar, rind, and juice; beat until smooth.  Yield:  enough for one 2-layer cake.

Chocolate Beet Cake with Beet Cream Cheese Frosting

Ingredients

For the cake

2 medium beets, unpeeled but trimmed of their greens

1 teaspoon vegetable oil

6 ounces (¾ cup) unsalted butter, softened, plus more for greasing the pans

1 cup packed brown sugar

¾ cup granulated sugar

2 large eggs

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting the pans

⅔ cup unsweetened natural cocoa powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1 ¼ cups buttermilk

For the frosting

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened

8 ounces cream cheese, softened

4 to 5 cups powdered sugar, sifted

2 tablespoons finely grated beets, mashed with a fork

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract or scrapings of one vanilla bean pod

1-2 teaspoons milk, depending on desired consistency

½ teaspoon fresh lemon juice

Pinch of salt

Directions

Place a rack in the center and upper third of the oven.  Preheat oven to 375˚F.

Thoroughly wash beets under running water, and trim their leaves, leaving about ½ inch of stem.  Place clean beets in a piece of foil.  Drizzle with just a bit of vegetable oil.  Seal up foil.  Place on a baking sheet in the oven.  Roast until beets are tender when pierced with a knife, about 1 hour.

Remove the beets from the oven.  Open the foil and allow beets to cool completely.  Beets will be easy to peel (just using a paring knife) once completely cooled.

Using a box grater, grate the peeled beets on the finest grating plane.  Measure ¾ cup of grated beets for the cake and 2 tablespoons for the frosting.  Set aside.

Reduce the oven temperature to 350˚.  Use butter to grease two 8 or 9-inch round baking pans.  Trace a piece of parchment paper so it is the same size as the bottom of the cake pan.  Cut it out and place inside the cake pan.  Butter the parchment paper.  Add a dusting of flour to coat the pan.  Set pans aside while you prepare the cake.

In the bowl of an electric stand mixer, fitted with a paddle attachment, cream together butter and sugars.  Beat on medium speed until pale and fluffy, about 3 to 5 minutes.  Beat in eggs, one at a time, for one minute after each addition.  Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl as necessary.  Once eggs are incorporated, beat in beets and vanilla extract until thoroughly combined.

In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.

Add half of the dry ingredients to the butter and egg mixture.  Beating on low speed, slowly add the buttermilk.  Once just incorporated, add the other half of the dry ingredients.  Beat on medium speed until milk and dry ingredients are just incorporated.  Try not to overmix the batter.  Bowl can be removed from the mixer and mixture folded with a spatula to finish incorporating ingredients.  Cake batter will be on the thick side…not pourable.

Divide the batter between the two prepared cake pans.  Bake for 23 to 25 minutes (for a 9-inch pan) or 30 to 32 minutes (for an 8-inch pan).  Cake is done when a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean.  Remove cakes from the oven and allow to rest for 10 minutes.  Invert cakes onto a cooling rack to cool completely before frosting and assembling the cake.

To make the frosting

In the bowl of an electric stand mixer, fitted with a paddle attachment, beat cream cheese for 30 seconds, until pliable and smooth.  Add the butter and beat for another 30 seconds, until well combined.  Stop the mixer and scrape down the bowl as necessary.  Beat in the beets.  Add the powdered sugar, vanilla extract, milk, lemon juice, and salt.  Beat on medium speed until smooth and silky   Refrigerate the frosting for 30 minutes before frosting the cooled cakes.

To assemble the cake

Place one layer of cake on a cake stand or cake plate.  Top with a generous amount of pink frosting.  Spread evenly.  Place the other cake on top of the frosting.  Top with frosting.  Work frosting onto the sides of the cake.  You will have extra frosting left over.  Refrigerate for an hour before serving (it will make cake easier to slice).  Cake will last, well wrapped in the refrigerator, for up to 4 days.

Yield:  Makes one 8 or 9-inch layer cake

Linda Alexander

Pictures by Starla Willis and Linda Alexander

 

 

 

Grow and Graze Salad Gardens Lecture and Recipes

Our Salad Gardens Program last Tuesday, March 19th included everything from easy-to follow directions for growing a tasty variety of salad lettuces, herbs, and edible flowers to a buffet brimming with a variety of salads that stirred the senses.

Some useful tips to help us get started were:

*Locate garden near a source of water

*Use compost for drainage and nutrients

*Use mulch to help retain moisture

*Use deep, infrequent watering

For a healthy foundation…start with good soil:

*Remove weeds, rock, debris

*If needed, order a soil test from Texas A&M

*Need 8-12 inches of loose tillable soil

*Ideal pH is 6.5 – 7.0 (DFW = 7.2)

*Do not work soil when it is wet

*Consider raised bed with special soil mix to start

*Build a compost pile

Growing salad greens:

*Greens include lettuce, herbs, salad greens and leafy green vegetables such as cabbage, collards, kale, mustard, spinach and Swiss chard

*Most greens are cool-season crops and must be grown in the early spring or fall in Texas. Some greens, especially kale, will withstand temperature below freezing and can be grown all winter. And, even in our hot Texas summer climate there are partially shaded spots to grow certain greens.

*Greens grow best in a well-drained soil with lots of organic matter. They prefer full sunlight but will tolerate partial shade.

*The soil should be worked at least 8 to 10 inches deep in the early spring when it is dry enough not to stick to garden tools. Break up large clods and remove trash and weeds. Work the soil into beds about 4 inches high. Add compost or organic matter before digging the soil.

*Greens grow best when given plenty of fertilizer. Adequate nitrogen is needed to develop the dark green leaf color. Before planting the seeds, apply a general garden fertilizer such as 10-10-10 at the rate of 2 to 3 pounds per 100 square feet. Mix fertilizer into the soil about 3 inches.

When shopping for seeds or transplants, consider the limitless possibilities for filling your garden with a variety of leafy greens. Rich in vitamins and folic acid, salad gardens provide both nutrition and fiber. Our mother’s admonition to “eat your greens” really was good advice.

Edible Garden tour after lecture and lunch

Here are a few of the crowd-pleasing salads our lunch guests enjoyed:

Mixed Green Salad with Nasturtiums and Raspberry Vinaigrette Raspberry Vinaigrette

To lend intrigue to a salad of mixed greens, toss in a handful of peppery nasturtium blossoms.

Ingredients

¼ cup raspberries

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 tablespoons raspberry or red-wine vinegar

½ teaspoon sugar

6 tablespoons olive oil

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Using a wooden spoon, push raspberries through a handheld wire strainer to puree.

In a medium bowl, whisk together 2 tablespoons raspberry puree, lemon juice, vinegar, and sugar.

In a slow but steady stream, whisk in olive oil until emulsified.  Season with salt and pepper.

Vinaigrette can be made 1 day in advance and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Yield:  Makes about ¾ cup

Adapted from Martha Stewart

Salad:

6 large handfuls of mixed greens, including wild rocket arugula, herb salad mix, etc.

6 nasturtium blossoms

Toss mixed greens with the vinaigrette.  Strew the blossoms over and serve immediately.  (Options:  may also toss with fresh blueberries or raspberries)

Fresh Spinach and Tatsoi Salad with Orange Curry Dressing

A “dressy” and inviting way to serve spinach. The addition of tatsoi gives it textural interest.

Ingredients

For the dressing

1 cup apple cider vinegar

2 tablespoons (heaping) orange marmalade

2 teaspoon curry powder

½ cup sugar

2 teaspoons dry mustard

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

½ teaspoon Tabasco sauce

1 ¾ cups vegetable oil

For the salad

4 bunches fresh spinach, trimmed

2 cups tatsoi leaves, optional

6 apples (red and green), chopped

2 cups golden raisins

1 ¾ cups walnut halves, lightly toasted

6 green onions, chopped

¼ cup sesame seed, toasted

1 pound bacon, chopped, crisp-fried, crumbled (optional)

Directions

Combine the vinegar, marmalade, curry powder, sugar, mustard, salt, pepper and Tabasco sauce in a blender container.

Add the oil in a fine stream, processing constantly at high speed until thickened.

Let stand at room temperature for 2 hours.  Chill, covered in the refrigerator until serving time.

Arrange equal amounts of the spinach and tatsoi on 12 salad plates or one large platter.  Drizzle with the dressing.

Sprinkle each serving or the platter with the apples, raisins, walnuts, green onions, sesame seeds and bacon bits.

Serve immediately.

Yield:  12 servings

Orange Fennel Watercress Salad with Lemon Ginger Poppyseed Dressing

Ingredients

2 large navel oranges

3-4 ounces baby watercress

½ medium fennel bulb cored and thinly sliced crosswise

¼ cup dried cranberries

¼ cup salted roasted pistachios

½ cup cutting celery, lightly chopped, for garnish (optional)

Lemon Ginger Poppyseed Dressing

Directions

Using a sharp knife, cut about ¼ to ½ inch from the top and bottom of the orange to expose the flesh. Place the fruit on one of its flat ends and cut down to remove the skin and the white pith. Rotate and repeat, working your way around the fruit until the orange fruit is completely exposed. Slice, dice or cut between the flesh and the white membrane to create orange segments.

Place most of the watercress (reserve a small amount) on a large serving plate or platter. Top with sliced fennel, oranges, dried cranberries and pistachios. Drizzle with the Lemon Ginger Dressing. Sprinkle reserved watercress and cutting celery over the salad.

Yield: Serves 4

Linda Alexander

Pictures by Starla Willis

Now we understand why Peter Rabbit ignored his mother’s warning and stole under that garden fence for a quick sampling of both lettuce and danger. We hope you enjoy your salad garden adventures as much as he did.

 

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