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Category Archives: Fall

More About Fall Color in Dallas 2018

The trees in North Texas are brighter and more colorful than ever — or at least that’s what some Dallas residents have determined.

Dallasites on Facebook have taken notice of the colorful fall foliage, with one poster saying, “All of that rain must’ve helped because I’ve never seen such pretty autumn leaves in Texas as I have this year.”

Another commenter said, “This year has been the prettiest of the 13 years we’ve been here.”

While that’s all conjecture, Daniel Cunningham, horticulturist with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and self-proclaimed “Texas Plant Guy,” said Texans taking notice of brighter colors might be onto something.

Cunningham explained that cool weather helps to break down the chlorophyll — that’s the green pigment in plants — allowing the yellow and orange pigments to shine through. When temperatures reach just above freezing, it increases anthocyanin formation, and that pigment produces the red and purple leaves.

The rain storms that plagued North Texas recently may have also helped the trees keep their leaves longer, giving them more time to change colors for all to see.

A commenter in a Facebook thread of Frisco residents comparing North Texas’ fall leaves with the colors of Northeastern fall leaves said, “As a lover of all things fall and someone who finally did a fall foliage trip a couple of years ago, it really is stunning this year.”

Cunningham said that autumn is the best time to plant trees in Texas as well as the perfect excuse to head over to a local tree nursery.

Another Facebook user said, “It’s gorgeous if you take side streets to your destination wherever that may be just to see the foliage.”

Cunningham agreed.

“Folks, get outside and enjoy it,” he said. “Whether you do that by walking in your neighborhood or hiking around DFW, do it because we probably only have two more weeks of this lovely fall color to enjoy.”

Thank you to the Dallas Observer and Nashwa Bawab  for allowing us to print this story.

Ann Lamb

Click here for tree  suggestions to plant now that will be rock stars next spring, article by Daniel Cunningham

Japanese Maple picture by Starla

 

Fall Color in Dallas 2018

 

Sweetgum tree with brilliant fall color at Raincatcher’s Garden

Eric,

This Fall has been spectacular with so many kinds of trees with brilliant fall colors. Some had said it has to do with our long hot summer while others have said the rain came at just the right time and it’s a combination of the two weather factors.

What do you think is causing such beautiful fall color in 2018?

What trees would you recommend for fall color? Say someone wants to buy a tree this fall in hopes for future fall color in their yard.

What about Shantung Maples, I see alot of those in my neighborhood and I like the shape of them. Ann

Hi Ann – So good to hear from you. I agree with you 100 % on the beautiful fall colors for many of our trees in the Urban Forest. There are many different opinions on the reasons for the beautiful colors this Fall. The truth is that tree people know that temperature(highs and lows), water, first freeze date, all play a part in the Fall colors but cannot figure out the exact timing of these variables to come up with a nice tidy equation that will let us all know when to expect the beautiful  colors.

My neighbor from New York planted a Bradford Pear a few years ago . She loved the Fall colors but also found out the final ending for Bradford Pears is not pretty. I suggested she might want to look at the Shantung Maple. She planted one four years ago and every year would ask me when the beautiful oranges and reds would show up. I told her to be patient, the yellow colors looked great but it wasn’t until this Fall that she finally got the brilliant oranges that she has been waiting on. I am thinking of trying one of the Shantung maples at RCG. I have given up on the Ginkgo. They require too much tender loving care for the first two years and we need to recommend trees that are hardy and can survive with a minimum amount of care to the public. I would also like to be able to fine a Big Tooth Maple but availability in the nurseries is very limited.

I think you are on the right trail with the Shantung.

Have a great Holiday season,

Eric

Thank you,Eric, and thank you for all the effort and thought you put into our demonstration forest at Raincatcher’s!

Ann Lamb

Picture by Starla Willis

Eric Larner is a Dallas County Master Gardener from the class of 2006 and a Citizen Forester. He and his wife, Jane(also a Master Gardener) work at The Raincatcher’s Garden and many other places in Dallas planting and speaking about trees.

 

Thanksgiving Menu

Thank you to our many readers who have purchased the Dallas County Master Gardener Association cookbook, A Year On The Plate. Copies are available on our website and at North Haven Gardens while supplies last.slide08

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Menu by Linda

Raincatcher’s Fall Veggie Garden

Please take a minute to go to this link to see information about our fall vegetable gardens. This link contains names of varieties, spacing information, and you can enlarge the plot plan for easier viewing.  Thank you, Dorothy, for setting this up for us! https://www.growveg.com/garden-plan.aspx?p=777788

Don’t forget tomorrow’s garden tour and sale of our cookbook, A YEAR ON THE PLATE, at 5030 Shadywood.

Questions? Leave a comment, we will answer or call the Master Gardener help desk at 214 904 3053.

Ann

Dorothy’s Garden On Tour October 1st!

dorothys-gardenDorothy Shockley still remembers summer suppers at her grandparents’ farm. “Of course, the homemade tomatoes were the highlight, but also, black-eyed peas, squash, fresh onions and strawberry shortcake,” she says.  “I’m sure meat was served, but I don’t think I ate anything but vegetables.”  In the Depression, her grandfather supported his family with a truck farm. “So my dad grew up working that farm.”

In the 1970s, you’d find Dorothy and Tommy at the end of their driveway selling corn they had raised on a one-acre plot on his family’s farm.  To supplement his income at Central Power and Light, Tommy would bring their produce to the office to sell.

Dorothy’s garden reflects her love of fresh vegetables.  It’s no wonder that to this day she would rather have a perfect summer tomato than a bouquet of flowers.

She concedes some space to drought-resistant perennials around the front drive. A large sugar barrel fountain is placed in ‘Coral Beauty’ cotoneaster, Italian cypress, ‘Kaleidoscope’ abelia, daylilies, skullcap and ‘Feed Back’ bearded iris.  She is intrigued by wire vine, a groundcover that spreads with a mat of wiry stems and tiny round leaves along a dry creek bed of river rock.  The front door plantings in purple and orange include ‘Lance Leaf’ coreopsis, Angelonia, coneflower and dwarf ruella.

But the side and backyard gardens are reserved for vegetables, herbs and compost.  “Our landscape was designed to give as much space as possible to attractive edible gardening,” she says.  When the Shockleys moved to their new house four years ago, they removed almost all the builder’s landscaping, including 12 trees.

The Cedar Post garden, punctuated by a bottle tree and cannas, is filled with five compost and shepherd’s bins.  In the backyard, visitors shouldn’t miss a darling fairy garden made by Dorothy and her granddaughter. The adjacent “pinwheel” garden is chockfull of eggplant, ‘Celebrity’ and heirloom tomatoes, peppers and strawberries.  Dorothy’s latest project in the three year old garden is a large east bed of okra, cantaloupe, thyme, sage and Mexican mint marigolds.

“Welcome to Dory’s Garden” says a sign in the backyard. Indeed, visitors might be treated to a perfect summer tomato.

Elizabeth

Click here for full garden tour information. The Dallas County Master Gardener Tour is this weekend!

Fall Garden Tour, October 1, Burke Garden

burke-garden-pic-program

Sherry Burke’s neighbor wasn’t crazy about her chain-link fence. She liked it.  After all, the fence had been around as long as her 1940s bungalow.  Sherry planted passion vine to hide the cyclone fence.  The passion vine brought the Gulf fritillaries, and the butterflies won over the neighbor.  Now the passion vine is taking a run over the garage.

In fact, Sherry’s backyard, filled with perennials, native Texas plants and ornamental grass, is a favorite in this casual Old East Dallas neighborhood. Friends look over the fence to see what’s growing, blooming or fluttering.  Monarchs and hummingbirds migrate through.  Tiny hairstreak butterflies are everywhere.  ‘John Fannick’ phlox blooms, a gift from Tony, Sherry’s manicurist.

You won’t find turfgrass. Not a blade.  “All it does is sit there,” says Sherry.  “I wanted something more interesting.”  And in a garden filled with friends and blooms, who has time to mow?

Elizabeth

Click here for full garden tour information.

 

Master Gardener Fall Garden Tour, October 1

quicheDon’t Miss the 2016 Garden Tour and Fall Fresh Garden Brunch on October 1st

What’s the best way to catch your breath when enjoying the 2016 Garden Tour? By indulging in a delightful Fall Fresh Garden Brunch on the patio of Linda Alexander’s garden, 5030 Shadywood Lane.  Linda’s garden will also be featured on the Tour.

Five Master Gardeners will welcome visitors to their stunning gardens for the Garden Tour on Saturday, October 1st.  Gardens on the Tour are open from 10 am to 4 pm.  Brunch will be served from 11 am – 1 pm.

You’ll also get a sneak peak at A Year on the Plate, the new Master Gardener cookbook.  Recipes for the Garden Brunch menu were chosen from A Year on the Plate and feature the best of fall local produce.

You need to act fast to get a brunch ticket for $15. Brunch reservations are limited, and tickets must be purchased by September 24.  Garden Tour and Brunch tickets will be available at the September 22 General Meeting. Tickets for the Tour and Brunch, and copies of A Year on the Plate are available at dallascountymastergardeners.org with PayPal.

A limited number of hardcover cookbooks will be for sale for $40 at the Garden Brunch. Sales will be reserved for Garden Tour visitors. Master Gardeners who have ordered copies of A Year on the Plate will receive their books in late October.

Fall Fresh Garden Brunch

Artichoke Bites

Iced Herb Gazpacho

Henkeeper’s Quiche

Fresh Spinach Salad with orange curry dressing

Breadbasket Trio: Sweet Potato Biscuits and herb butter, Glazed Lemon Zucchini Bread and Lemon Verbena Bread

Maple Pecan Tartlet & Cranberry Pear Crisp

Lemon Verbena Iced Tea

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