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The Raincatcher’s Garden Fall 2022

November 18, 2022

A note from Jackie:

I thought I would follow up the beautiful fall photos Starla submitted to the blog with these photos of our garden that I recently received from our friend, Diane Washam.

Check out this bee visiting our Mexican Honeysuckle Plant. This plant blooms from late spring to fall.
I have never seen garlic chive seeds look so beautiful!
This lizard looks quite comfortable on the spotted manfreda plant.
Mexican Mint Marigold looking pretty after the rain.
Lambs Quarter is in the same plant family as spinach, chard and beets.
This is the Fidalgo Roxa pepper. We planted it on the courtyard as an ornamental plant. The beautiful, colorful peppers look like candy! However, don’t let the candy like appearance fool you as this pepper is extremely hot.
It was a good year for peppers! This is one of the many pepper plants that we planted in the edible garden, the donation garden and the courtyard garden. Many of these wonderful peppers were donated to the food bank, many of them were used to make our jalapeno jellies and a few were just there as ornamental plants to add interest to our gardens.

Jackie James, Dallas County Master Gardener Class of 1993

Photos by Diane Washam

Spotted Manfreda Plant

May 12, 2021

Spotted Manfreda Plant

Several weeks ago during a recent work day at the garden, we noticed a flower stalk coming up from the middle of a couple of our spotted manfreda plants on the courtyard of Raincatcher’s Garden.  This particular succulent plant, also know as Texas Tuberose or Manfreda maculosa is short (grows 12 – 15 inches tall) with silvery green leaves and is covered with purple spots. It is native to southern Texas and northern Mexico and does best in full sun.  It is considered a tender perennial but is often an evergreen plant in mild winters.  It completely died back this past winter and not only came back this spring but quickly produced a flower stalk.  

Manfreda in Bloom

The plant eventually grows into a thick clump of shoots connected at the roots and is often referred to as a ground cover plant.  The best part about the growth habit of this plant is that it is begging to be shared.  In fact, I got my plant many years ago from a couple who were on the city of Dallas Water Wise Garden tour.  As soon as I asked the home owner about the plant, she quickly retrieved a trowel and dug up an offshoot for me.  I have lost count of how many of these plants I have given to gardening friends as well as planting several in the courtyard at Midway Hills Christian Church.

The Alien Looking Flower of the Manfreda

I did a bit of research about the flower and I found that the relatively tall inflorescent carries mildly fragrant tubular flowers.  The flowers lack colorful petals, but have especially long pistils and stamens.  One website described the flower as “alien looking.”   

This is a plant to consider growing in your garden or in a container.  And if you’re lucky, it will gift you with a large, alien looking flower!

Jackie James Dallas County Master Gardener Class of 1993

We will have a couple of varieties of manfreda plants available at our plant sale on May 13th and 14th.   Hope to see you there.

Jackie James, Dallas County Master Gardener Class of 1993

Flower Photos by garden friend, Diane Washam 


PLANT SALE LOCATION: 11001 MIDWAY ROAD, DALLAS, TEXAS 75229

MAY 13TH AND 14TH

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