RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Garden Tour in Dallas

Dorothy’s Garden On Tour October 1st!

dorothys-gardenDorothy Shockley still remembers summer suppers at her grandparents’ farm. “Of course, the homemade tomatoes were the highlight, but also, black-eyed peas, squash, fresh onions and strawberry shortcake,” she says.  “I’m sure meat was served, but I don’t think I ate anything but vegetables.”  In the Depression, her grandfather supported his family with a truck farm. “So my dad grew up working that farm.”

In the 1970s, you’d find Dorothy and Tommy at the end of their driveway selling corn they had raised on a one-acre plot on his family’s farm.  To supplement his income at Central Power and Light, Tommy would bring their produce to the office to sell.

Dorothy’s garden reflects her love of fresh vegetables.  It’s no wonder that to this day she would rather have a perfect summer tomato than a bouquet of flowers.

She concedes some space to drought-resistant perennials around the front drive. A large sugar barrel fountain is placed in ‘Coral Beauty’ cotoneaster, Italian cypress, ‘Kaleidoscope’ abelia, daylilies, skullcap and ‘Feed Back’ bearded iris.  She is intrigued by wire vine, a groundcover that spreads with a mat of wiry stems and tiny round leaves along a dry creek bed of river rock.  The front door plantings in purple and orange include ‘Lance Leaf’ coreopsis, Angelonia, coneflower and dwarf ruella.

But the side and backyard gardens are reserved for vegetables, herbs and compost.  “Our landscape was designed to give as much space as possible to attractive edible gardening,” she says.  When the Shockleys moved to their new house four years ago, they removed almost all the builder’s landscaping, including 12 trees.

The Cedar Post garden, punctuated by a bottle tree and cannas, is filled with five compost and shepherd’s bins.  In the backyard, visitors shouldn’t miss a darling fairy garden made by Dorothy and her granddaughter. The adjacent “pinwheel” garden is chockfull of eggplant, ‘Celebrity’ and heirloom tomatoes, peppers and strawberries.  Dorothy’s latest project in the three year old garden is a large east bed of okra, cantaloupe, thyme, sage and Mexican mint marigolds.

“Welcome to Dory’s Garden” says a sign in the backyard. Indeed, visitors might be treated to a perfect summer tomato.

Elizabeth

Click here for full garden tour information. The Dallas County Master Gardener Tour is this weekend!

Mary Louise Whitlow’s Garden, October 1, Garden Tour

Above: Whitlow Garden on Tour, October 1

Above: Whitlow Garden on Tour, October 1

Mary Louise Whitlow had an “ah ha” moment in the 1990s. She was watering the grass taking up her home’s parkway with a garden hose.  “Why am I doing this?” she asked herself.  “I don’t even like grass.”

Next thing you know, the grass was out, and she had started on what became a large pollinator garden of native and adapted plants.

Over the years, the garden has expanded past the sidewalk and up the yard’s slope to stop at the shade from her large pecan tree.

Mary Louise grew up in the charming home, one of the few original houses remaining in University Park.  Her grandmother gave the pecan tree to her parents when they moved in the house in the mid-1950s.

Mary Louise’s landscape philosophy is straightforward: buy one or two plants of a variety and see what works with limited water, fertilizer and organic pesticides.  Now she has “more salvias than you can count.”  She particularly loves Gregg’s mistflower and frostweed because the plants attract Monarch and Queen butterflies.  She has found zexmenia to be as “tough as nails” and pipevine so resilient that “the caterpillars eat it to a nub and it’s back in a week.” The Jerusalem sage yellow blooms are so beautiful, she says, that her neighbors “stop and stare.”

Two hugelkultur gardens are mounded by the front door.  Mary Louise has found that the layers of rotten tree limbs, branches and soil are very efficient in breaking up Texas clay soil and retaining moisture.  She has successfully planted tomatoes in decomposing organic straw bales in the backyard.

Her backyard chain-link fence is lined with fig trees, including ‘Alma’, ‘Brown Turkey’ and ‘Celeste.’  Mary Louise harvested enough figs this year to can 71 pints of fig jam.

Elizabeth

Click here for full garden tour information.

October 1st, Dallas County Master Gardener Fall Garden Tour

alexander yard

Call it love at first sight. Linda and Art Alexander were in the market to purchase a new home in 2006.  They swooned over a Bluffview listing awash in April wisteria, dogwood, azaleas and tulips.  They quickly signed the contract.

Her landscape reflects a love of entertaining. One of Linda’s favorite quotes is: “The ornaments of your house will be the guests who frequent it.” The Alexanders have hosted more than 100 get-togethers at the 1948 ranch designed by noted regional architect Charles Dilbeck.

Visitors to the Alexander garden can see how Linda carefully edited mature landscaping from previous owners to frame the historic home. She developed cohesive garden rooms on the large lot, adding shrubs and perennials along the circular drive to welcome visitors.  Tall live oak trees shade conversation and seating areas for backyard entertaining.  She even planted Oklahoma-red pentas for the fall Texas-OU Red River Showdown post-game party. Linda’s updated raised vegetable beds are tucked behind the guesthouse.

Following herb expert Marian Buchanan’s advice, she particularly loves to grow herbs and uses them for cooking, flower arrangements and in the landscape. She says Art likes the herb scents when he brushes against the plants on a garden path.

You’ll often find Art and Linda in the garden swing in the backyard patio. They welcome the morning sun, cuddle a new grandchild and enjoy the yard they call “our sanctuary.”

Elizabeth

We will be featuring one garden a week until the October 1st Fall Garden Tour on Dallas Garden Buzz. Tour tickets can be purchased now online at the Master Gardener website.  Brunch will be served at the Alexander home and are also available now.  Plan ahead and purchase your tickets because the brunch tickets are limited. The menu will be based on recipes from the Master Gardner cookbook, A Year on the Plate. To pre-order the cookbook, click here.

Tour Tickets purchased before October 1-$15

Brunch Tickets-$15

Cookbook-$40

%d bloggers like this: