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Fall Crops For Dallas Veggie Gardens

If you are feeling the heat, you may think of September as the end of summer but if you are outside ready to work in your veggie patch;  fall is on your mind.

At the Demonstration Garden on Joe Field Road, we are busy planting and preparing for fall.  Jim, as always, is way ahead of most of us and provides this useful fall planting guide : For our fall crop info click here.

Last week we planted seeds of  green and yellow bush beans and yellow squash.

Next up, seeds of beets, peas, carrots lettuce and radishes with broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower transplants.

Seeds for Fall Planting in Dallas Gardens

Seeds for Fall Planting in Dallas Gardens

Prepare your beds for fall planting:

  • First, decide what crops will produce through fall, pull the diseased and finished or  non producing vegetables. For instance, I will save jalepeno,  okra, basil, and one of my tomato plants.
  • Pull back the mulch or set it aside on a tarp or in a wheelbarrow and add compost to your vegetable bed.  It is important to remove the mulch for seed planting and so that you don’t incorporate it into the soil.
  • After adding and forking your compost into the soil, you are ready to sow seeds or add transplants.
  •  Add back the mulch around transplants only. When your seeds have sprouted and have their “true” leaves, you can gingerly add mulch to these plants.

Ann

Two More Fall Planting Resources:

TAMU Fall Planting Guide and NHG Guide

Homegrown, Veggies, Fruits and Herbs

I have a visual image of Master Gardener and nutritionist Barbara Gollman at Kroger: Red hair flying, trim figure running behind a cart, zipping down the frozen food isle flinging packs of frozen veggies into the cart for one of her wonderful soups. 

Barbara, Dallas County Master Gardener Teaches Value of Vegetables

Barbara intrigued a large group of Master Gardeners Tuesday with her talk on the nutritional benefit of vegetables, fruits, and herbs.  Turns out that Mom was correct when she urged us to eat our vegetables.  Carrots, oranges, sweet potatoes, and other fruits and vegetables are full of phytochemicals, substances in plants that have the potential to slow aging, boost immunity, prevent disease, and strengthen our hearts and circulation. 

Cabbage, Broccoli Field Road, Dallas, Texas

Barbara suggests that we eat watermelon and tomatoes, plants that are packed with lycopene, a nutrient which helps prevent macular degeneration.  Pinto beans are rich in fiber, which can prevent cancer and heart disease, and flavonoids, which can curb the oxidation of LDL cholesterol and prevent blood clotting.  Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cabbage are high in calcium.  Nuts are filled with Vitamin E, one of the most potent fat-soluble antioxidants. Berries, greens, winter squash—-well, you get the idea.  

Barbara said that new research has shown the health benefits of herbs. Who knew? Turns out that 1 teaspoon of oregano = ¾ cup of brussel sprouts in antioxidants.  

Barbara dries her herbs in the microwave after her husband’s reaction to using his closet as an herb drying rack. Remove the leaves from the stems of the herbs and spread on paper towels.  Put two paper towels on top of the herbs.  Pop in the microwave and zap for one minute.  (If the leaves are charred, try again and use a shorter amount of time. If the leaves aren’t crisp, microwave longer in 15-second increments.)  Remove from the microwave and air dry on the kitchen counter for a few days.  Store in a labeled glass jar.  

Are home grown vegetables better for you than those found in the grocery? Barbara says some research showed up to a 15 percent increase in nutrients in homegrown and organic vegetables.  Some other studies didn’t find an increase in nutrients. 

Many thanks go to Barbara for her research and common sense approach to healthy eating.  Let’s just put it this way: on the way home I stopped at Whole Foods and bought spinach, broccoli, and almonds for dinner.   

Elizabeth

Recipes served in the class will follow.

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