RSS Feed

Category Archives: Summer

August 2017 at Raincatcher’s

We appreciate and enjoy our new shade structure!

Our rain garden flourishes with purpose and beauty.

Our volunteers are busy with projects like staining vegetable beds.

Our roses are carefully monitored in Rose Rosette Trials.

Please visit us at The Raincatcher’s Garden. We are at work Tuesday mornings and also have several upcoming education events open to the public. Drop a comment if you would like more information or call the Master Gardener Help Desk 214 904 3053.

Ann Lamb

Pictures by Starla Willis

Hurricane Harvey 2017

Our hearts are with our fellow Texans under duress because of Hurricane Harvey.

Here are two posts about the area:

Hummer Festival

The Big Tree

Ann Lamb

 

 

 

 

August Color in the Garden

Starla said, “my favorite color this week is violet.”

Thank you, Starla, we like it and welcome back!

Ann Lamb

Click here for other August photos

Send us your comments about the eclipse! We are interested!

Touch-Me-Not or Sensitive Plant, Mimosa pudica

Do  you ever experience going back in time?   Ok, not time travel per say, but something reminding you of a place, a person,  an event, a smell, a plant,  a food  and you go back  to a simpler time

Most recently,  it was the smell and taste of a peach cobbler.  This time  going back to my grandmother’s kitchen and her orchard where we played in the red sandy soil for hours on end.

All of a sudden you are transported to that moment, the memory washes over you, and you smile at the wonder, the beauty, the remembrance. What takes you back?

The Touch-Me-Not Plant and It's Pretty Pink Flower

The Touch-Me-Not Plant and It’s Pretty Pink Flower

For me,  the touch- me- not plant  found in the field took me back to my first introduction of the magic of the leaves closing up when touched. I was a child again: amazed, mesmerized, and in awe of the wonders of this world.

 

Take the trip back:  treasure it, enjoy it,  relive it; because soon enough the reality of today will be present.

Starla

 

 

 

 

Happy 4th of July

coreopsis and flag

HAPPY 4TH OF JULY FROM DALLAS GARDEN BUZZ!

4th of July

Pictures by Starla!

What I Like About August

Walking through our hot, August garden last week, here are some of the things I saw and loved:

Cosmos Growing High  into the Sky

Cosmos Growing High into the Sky

Garlic Chives in Bloom

Garlic Chives in Bloom

And from my garden at home:

Orderly Okra

Orderly Okra

The tag that came with this plant reads:

Okra, Jing Orange

60 days. sun. drought tolerant. Lovely pods area deep reddish orange and quite colorful. This Asian variety produces lots of flavorful 6″pods. Unique. Pick pods when young and tender. (I recommend picking at  1.5-2″)

For an okra recipe you will love, click here.

For more about what’s blooming in August, click here.

Ann

What Would We Do Without Turk’s Cap?

All gardeners have those tough spots where nothing seems to want to grow.  Dry shade? Morning shade followed by hot west sun? Neglected, hard to water spots? It’s enough to bring on a tension headache.

The bright apple green leaves and red furled blooms of Turk’s cap Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii are often just the right solution.  I love easy to grow plants, but this Texas native is almost beyond belief.  Shade, sun, or a little of both? Moist or just on rainfall alone?  Clay, loam, sand, or limestone soils (with good drainage)?  Insect damage? Very minimal. All North Texas gardeners have to do is cut the stems back to the ground after a hard freeze in the fall.

The blooms on Turk’s cap are so unusual.  The vermillion red flowers are twisted into a loose tube of overlapping petals, with a red stamen protruding from the center.  The flowers are said to resemble a Turkish turban, thus the name, Turk’s cap.  Butterflies and hummingbirds are drawn to the blooms.  The marble-sized fruit is edible and is enjoyed by a number of birds and animals.

Red Turk's Cap, Dallas Garden Buzz

At the Demonstration Garden, we have enjoyed a Turk’s cap with pink blooms for many years.  I hope it is the Greg Grant introduction, named after the first woman horticulture student at Texas A&M, Pam Puryear.  Her namesake has been designated a Texas Superstar by the AgriLife Extension Service.

Pink Turk's Cap

Pink Turk’s Cap

The variety name for Turk’s cap, Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii,  honors another groundbreaking botanist in Texas.  Thomas Drummond was a Scottish naturalist, born in Scotland about 1790.  In 1830, he came to America to collect plant specimens from the western and southern United States.  He arrived in Velasco, Texas, in March 1833, and collected 750 species of plants and 150 specimens of birds in the almost two years he worked in central Texas.

Although Turk’s cap will adapt to full sun (and I do have several blooming like crazy in west sun), I really think it should be ideally planted in morning sun, afternoon shade.  I have found that if Turk’s cap is in deep shade, the blooms are limited.  Although Turk’s cap is drought tolerant, the plant will wilt noticeably in full sun.  It loves heat, and is a dependable August bloomer.  The bloom season runs from May to November.

For a low maintenance light to medium-shade garden, mix Turk’s cap with southern wood fern and caladiums.

Elizabeth

Pictures by Starla and Ann

For more perennial information see our post on Gardening With Perennials.

%d bloggers like this: