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Tag Archives: Wild Clematis

Wildflowers in East Texas

June 4, 2019

The roads of East Texas are full of wildflowers and I got to be in East Texas at just the right time. A new grandson was born in May. One day during my visit, my grandaughter and I walked the fields looking at wildflowers.

Queen Anne’s lace was everywhere. It is an ancestor of the garden carrot and it’s taproot can be cooked and eaten.

Above: Queen Anne’s Lace

Another white flower was en masse along the roads. Woolly-White is common in East Texas along roadsides and uncultivated land.

Above: Woolly-White or wild cauliflower

You’ve got to love a plant like sensitive brier that has feelings. Touch the foliage and it bashfully closes. The prickly stems protect it’s sensitive nature.

Above: Sensitive Brier

This picture was taken on a misty morning. Hope you don’t mind the blur effect. Enjoy this beautiful blue and the simplicity of the three petaled flower.

Above: Ohio Spiderwort

Cherokee Indians steeped the roots of Venus’s Looking Glass with other plants and drank the infusion for indigestion.

Above: Venus’s Looking-Glass

Cows enjoy grazing this daisy. Now that I am back home looking at these pictures and reading my wildflower guides, I realize how much was missed. This flower is fragrant and I never even noticed ! I’ll not chastise myself too much because fire ants and poison ivy were all around. Grandaughter and I had to stay clear of those dangers.

Above: Huisache Daisy

Another bright yellow flower but this one is not tasty. Honey made from pollen of this flower is very bitter and unpalatable. Hence the name-bitterweed.

Above: Yellow Bitterweed

Only a few Indian Paintbrush flowers were seen, but even one makes a brilliant statement.

Above: Indian Paintbrush

Wild clematis, what a find! The nodding bell shape flowers  are so unusual. Notice the bumble bee mining a blossom, upper left.

Above: Bellflower Clematis, Clematis pitcherii

These two wildflower books helped with plant id: Wildflowers of Texas by Geyata Ajilvsgi and Texas Wildflowers by Campbell and Lynn Loughmiller.

In future years, hunting wildflowers could become a family outing. The fields in May are full of them and they will always remind me of a special birthday.

Ann Lamb

Pictures by me and grandaughter!

 

 

 

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